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Clinician-delivered Intervention to Facilitate Tobacco Quitline Use by Surgical Patients.
MedLine Citation:
PMID:  21317630     Owner:  NLM     Status:  Publisher    
Abstract/OtherAbstract:
BACKGROUND:: Telephone quitlines that provide counseling support are efficacious in helping cigarette smokers quit and have been widely disseminated; currently, they are underused. Surgery represents a teachable moment for smoking cessation, which can benefit surgical outcomes; however, few surgical patients receive smoking cessation interventions. This study developed and tested a clinician-delivered intervention to facilitate quitline use by adult patients scheduled for elective surgery. METHODS:: After formative work involving patients and clinicians, a brief intervention was designed to facilitate telephone quitline use. It was then evaluated in a randomized trial of 300 adults scheduled for elective surgery. A control standard brief stop-smoking intervention served as a comparator, with both interventions delivered by clinicians. The primary outcome was the use rate of a quitline accessed through a dedicated toll-free telephone number, with use defined as completing at least one full counseling session. Secondary outcomes included self-reported abstinence from cigarettes at 30 and 90 days postoperatively. RESULTS:: Subject characteristics were similar between the two groups. Records from the designated quitline documented that 29 of 149 subjects (19.5%) in the quitline intervention group and 0 of 151 subjects in the control group completed the first full counseling session (P < 0.0001). There were no significant differences in the self-reported point-prevalent and continuous abstinence rates between groups at either 30 or 90 days postoperatively, although rates tended to be higher in the quitline intervention group. CONCLUSIONS:: Clinicians can effectively facilitate quitline use by surgical patients. Further work is necessary to evaluate the efficacy of this approach in terms of long-term abstinence from cigarette smoking.
Authors:
David O Warner; Robert C Klesges; Lowell C Dale; Kenneth P Offord; Darrell R Schroeder; Yu Shi; Kristin S Vickers; David R Danielson
Publication Detail:
Type:  JOURNAL ARTICLE     Date:  2011-2-10
Journal Detail:
Title:  Anesthesiology     Volume:  -     ISSN:  1528-1175     ISO Abbreviation:  -     Publication Date:  2011 Feb 
Date Detail:
Created Date:  2011-2-14     Completed Date:  -     Revised Date:  -    
Medline Journal Info:
Nlm Unique ID:  1300217     Medline TA:  Anesthesiology     Country:  -    
Other Details:
Languages:  ENG     Pagination:  -     Citation Subset:  -    
Affiliation:
* Professor of Anesthesiology, # Research Fellow, Departments of Anesthesiology and the Nicotine Research Center, ‡ Associate Professor of Medicine, Departments of Medicine and the Nicotine Research Center, § Professor of Biostatistics, Emeritus, Departments of Health Sciences Research and the Nicotine Research Center, ∥ Assistant Professor of Biostatistics, Departments of Health Sciences Research and the Nicotine Research Center, ** Associate Professor of Psychology, Departments of Psychiatry and Psychology and the Nicotine Research Center, †† Assistant Professor of Anesthesiology, Departments of Anesthesiology, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, Minnesota; and † Professor of Preventive Medicine, Department of Preventative Medicine, University of Tennessee Health Science Center and Department of Epidemiology and Cancer Control, Saint Jude Children's Research Hospital, Memphis, Tennessee.
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