Document Detail


Clinical experimentation with intravenously administered disopyramide
MedLine Citation:
PMID:  1084657     Owner:  NLM     Status:  MEDLINE    
Abstract/OtherAbstract:
The intravenous injection of disopyramide (1.5 mg/kg) induces the return to sinus rhythm in about 60% of arrhythmias. When there exist perturbations of the cardiac rhythm, secondary to recent myocardial infarction, the percentage of success reaches 70%. The drug induces the disappearance of the extrasystoles in 80% of the cases, whatever the nature of the underlying cardiopathy. Although the secondary effects of the drug are slight, it is advisable to administer the substance in a slow intravenous injection (5 minutes), while controlling the arterial pressure and the E.C.G.
Authors:
R Vandenbosch; N Lisin; M Andriange; J Gach; J Carlier
Publication Detail:
Type:  English Abstract; Journal Article    
Journal Detail:
Title:  Acta cardiologica     Volume:  30     ISSN:  0001-5385     ISO Abbreviation:  Acta Cardiol     Publication Date:  1975  
Date Detail:
Created Date:  1976-08-23     Completed Date:  1976-08-23     Revised Date:  2009-06-11    
Medline Journal Info:
Nlm Unique ID:  0370570     Medline TA:  Acta Cardiol     Country:  BELGIUM    
Other Details:
Languages:  fre     Pagination:  267-78     Citation Subset:  IM    
Vernacular Title:
Experimentation clinique du disopyramide administre par voie intraveineuse
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MeSH Terms
Descriptor/Qualifier:
Adult
Aged
Arrhythmias, Cardiac / drug therapy*
Disopyramide / administration & dosage,  adverse effects,  therapeutic use*
Drug Evaluation
Female
Humans
Injections, Intravenous
Male
Middle Aged
Pyridines / therapeutic use*
Chemical
Reg. No./Substance:
0/Pyridines; 3737-09-5/Disopyramide

From MEDLINE®/PubMed®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine


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