Document Detail


Chronic fenfluramine treatment: effects on body weight, food intake and energy expenditure.
MedLine Citation:
PMID:  7866463     Owner:  NLM     Status:  MEDLINE    
Abstract/OtherAbstract:
Fenfluramine suppressess the body weight of experimental animals during chronic treatment by a mechanism that is not yet clear. The present research investigated the contributions of fenfluramine-induced alterations in food intake and two components of energy expenditure, resting energy expenditure (REE) and the thermic effect of food (TEF), to maintenance of a lowered body weight in male Long Evans rats. DI-Fenfluramine (20 mg/kg) produced an initial severe anorexia and weight loss. Food intake then increased steadily, reaching control levels by the fourth day of treatment. Tolerance to the anorectic effects of fenfluramine was not complete however -- food intake of fenfluramine-treated rats fell below control levels on 7 of the remaining 20 days of treatment. The body weight of fenfluramine treated rats remained significantly below control levels throughout the entire treatment period, but rose rapidly to control levels following fenfluramine withdrawal. REE was unaffected by fenfluramine treatment. By contrast, fenfluramine treatment significantly altered the TEF. Twenty-four hours after initiation of treatment the TEF of fenfluramine treated animals was higher than that of controls. On the 15th day of drug administration and the first day of fenfluramine withdrawal, however, the TEF of control and treated animals no longer differed. By contrast, on the second day of fenfluramine withdrawal the TEF of fenfluramine treated rats was suppressed to 17% of control levels. These findings suggest that the effect of fenfluramine on body weight involves modulation of both food intake and energy expenditure.
Authors:
D D Stallone; D A Levitsky
Related Documents :
20525373 - Neighborhood and weight-related health behaviors in the look ahead (action for health i...
24446333 - Food cravings among bariatric surgery candidates.
17081833 - Calcium and dairy intakes of adolescents are associated with their home environment, ta...
Publication Detail:
Type:  Journal Article; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't    
Journal Detail:
Title:  International journal of obesity and related metabolic disorders : journal of the International Association for the Study of Obesity     Volume:  18     ISSN:  0307-0565     ISO Abbreviation:  Int. J. Obes. Relat. Metab. Disord.     Publication Date:  1994 Oct 
Date Detail:
Created Date:  1995-03-30     Completed Date:  1995-03-30     Revised Date:  2006-11-15    
Medline Journal Info:
Nlm Unique ID:  9313169     Medline TA:  Int J Obes Relat Metab Disord     Country:  ENGLAND    
Other Details:
Languages:  eng     Pagination:  679-85     Citation Subset:  IM    
Affiliation:
Cornell University, Division of Nutritional Sciences, Ithaca, New York 14850.
Export Citation:
APA/MLA Format     Download EndNote     Download BibTex
MeSH Terms
Descriptor/Qualifier:
Animals
Body Weight / drug effects*,  physiology
Dose-Response Relationship, Drug
Eating / drug effects*,  physiology
Energy Metabolism / drug effects*,  physiology
Fasting / physiology
Fenfluramine / pharmacology*
Male
Rats
Rest / physiology
Time Factors
Chemical
Reg. No./Substance:
458-24-2/Fenfluramine

From MEDLINE®/PubMed®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine


Previous Document:  Size, fatness and relative fat distribution of males of contrasting maturity status during adolescen...
Next Document:  Abdominal obesity and mortality risk among men in nineteenth-century North America.