Document Detail


Chimpanzees help conspecifics obtain food and non-food items.
MedLine Citation:
PMID:  20980301     Owner:  NLM     Status:  MEDLINE    
Abstract/OtherAbstract:
Chimpanzees (Pan troglodytes) sometimes help both humans and conspecifics in experimental situations in which immediate selfish benefits can be ruled out. However, in several experiments, chimpanzees have not provided food to a conspecific even when it would cost them nothing, leading to the hypothesis that prosociality in the food-provisioning context is a derived trait in humans. Here, we show that chimpanzees help conspecifics obtain both food and non-food items--given that the donor cannot get the food herself. Furthermore, we show that the key factor eliciting chimpanzees' targeted helping is the recipients' attempts to either get the food or get the attention of the potential donor. The current findings add to the accumulating body of evidence that humans and chimpanzees share the motivation and skills necessary to help others in situations in which they cannot selfishly benefit. Humans, however, show prosocial motives more readily and in a wider range of contexts.
Authors:
Alicia P Melis; Felix Warneken; Keith Jensen; Anna-Claire Schneider; Josep Call; Michael Tomasello
Publication Detail:
Type:  Journal Article     Date:  2010-10-27
Journal Detail:
Title:  Proceedings. Biological sciences / The Royal Society     Volume:  278     ISSN:  1471-2954     ISO Abbreviation:  Proc. Biol. Sci.     Publication Date:  2011 May 
Date Detail:
Created Date:  2011-03-24     Completed Date:  2011-08-01     Revised Date:  2014-03-25    
Medline Journal Info:
Nlm Unique ID:  101245157     Medline TA:  Proc Biol Sci     Country:  England    
Other Details:
Languages:  eng     Pagination:  1405-13     Citation Subset:  IM    
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MeSH Terms
Descriptor/Qualifier:
Animals
Behavior, Animal*
Female
Food
Helping Behavior*
Male
Motivation
Pan troglodytes / physiology*
Reward*
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