Document Detail


Children's estimates of food portion size: the effect of timing of dietary interview on the accuracy of children's portion size estimates.
MedLine Citation:
PMID:  17651522     Owner:  NLM     Status:  MEDLINE    
Abstract/OtherAbstract:
For food intakes to be converted into nutrient intakes a measure or estimate of the amount of food consumed is required. A number of methods have been developed to assist subjects in providing an estimate of portion size. Children's ability to use perception, conceptualisation and memory skills to estimate food portion size has not been investigated systematically. The aim of the present study was to test the effect of the timing of a dietary interview on the accuracy of estimates of food portion sizes made by children, using food photographs, food models and an interactive portion size assessment system, developed for use with children and based on portion sizes of foods consumed by children. Children (n 108) aged 4-14 years were supplied with known quantities of foods and asked to estimate the portion size of each food using each of the three portion size assessment tools. Interviews took place (a) with the food in view, (b) just after the child had eaten the food or (c) 24 h after the child had eaten the food. There were no significant differences in children's ability to estimate food portion size (either as served or as eaten) with timing of interview. That is, children were as accurate in their estimates of portion size 24 h after consuming the food as when the food was in view. Under these conditions many children were able to estimate food portion size utilising perception, conceptualisation and memory skills.
Authors:
E Foster; M O'Keeffe; J N S Matthews; J C Mathers; M Nelson; K L Barton; W L Wrieden; A J Adamson
Publication Detail:
Type:  Journal Article; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't     Date:  2007-07-26
Journal Detail:
Title:  The British journal of nutrition     Volume:  99     ISSN:  0007-1145     ISO Abbreviation:  Br. J. Nutr.     Publication Date:  2008 Jan 
Date Detail:
Created Date:  2007-12-18     Completed Date:  2008-05-16     Revised Date:  -    
Medline Journal Info:
Nlm Unique ID:  0372547     Medline TA:  Br J Nutr     Country:  England    
Other Details:
Languages:  eng     Pagination:  185-90     Citation Subset:  IM    
Affiliation:
Human Nutrition Research Centre, School of Clinical Medical Sciences, University of Newcastle, Room M1151, 1st Floor, William Leech Building, Framlington Place, Newcastle upon Tyne, NE2 4HH, UK. Emma.Foster@ncl.ac.uk
Export Citation:
APA/MLA Format     Download EndNote     Download BibTex
MeSH Terms
Descriptor/Qualifier:
Adolescent
Child
Child, Preschool
Diet Surveys*
Energy Intake
Food*
Humans
Interviews as Topic
Mental Recall
Postprandial Period
Size Perception / physiology*

From MEDLINE®/PubMed®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine


Previous Document:  Dietary Selenium for the counteraction of oxidative damage: fortified foods or supplements?
Next Document:  Gender differences in depression among the very old.