Document Detail


Changes in the use of postnatal steroids for bronchopulmonary dysplasia in 3 large neonatal networks.
MedLine Citation:
PMID:  17079534     Owner:  NLM     Status:  MEDLINE    
Abstract/OtherAbstract:
BACKGROUND: Postnatal corticosteroids were widely used in the 1990s in an attempt to reduce the incidence of bronchopulmonary dysplasia. However, high rates of short-term adverse effects and impaired neurodevelopmental outcomes were seen. In early 2002, a joint statement of the American Academy of Pediatrics and Canadian Paediatric Society called for limitation in the use of postnatal corticosteroids. The impact of this statement is not known. OBJECTIVES: The purpose of this work was to determine the frequency of postnatal corticosteroid use and mortality and morbidities over time, particularly before and after the joint statement. DESIGN/METHODS: We conducted a retrospective analysis of cohort data within 3 large network registries (the National Institute of Child Health and Development Neonatal Research Network [18 centers], the Vermont Oxford Network [444 centers], and the Canadian Neonatal Network [10 centers]) for the following 3 periods: prestatement (2001), statement (2002), and poststatement (2003) of very low birth-weight infants (501-1500 g). The National Institute of Child Health and Development Neonatal Research Network and the Vermont Oxford Network were also analyzed for longer-term trends from 1990 to 2003. Postnatal corticosteroid use, mortality at discharge, and neonatal morbidities (bronchopulmonary dysplasia at 36 weeks, late-onset infection >72 hours of age, necrotizing enterocolitis treated with surgery, and length of stay) between periods were compared. RESULTS: Mean birth weight (range: 1022-1060 g), postmenstrual age (28 weeks), and gender (51% male) were similar between the networks. Race differed with more black infants in the National Institute of Child Health and Development Neonatal Research Network than the Vermont Oxford Network (38% vs 24%). Antenatal steroid use was similar (range: 61%-75%). Postnatal corticosteroid use rose from 1990 (8%-16%), peaked in 1996-1998 (24%-28%), and began to decline in 1999. Use in 2003 was significantly less than in 2001. Mortality and major morbidities were similar. CONCLUSIONS: Postnatal corticosteroid use had decreased significantly in 3 large neonatal networks before the joint statement with further decreases after the statement with no apparent impact on mortality and short-term morbidity. Despite substantial decreases, approximately 8% of very low birth-weight infants continue to be treated with postnatal corticosteroid.
Authors:
Michele C Walsh; Qing Yao; Jeffrey D Horbar; Joseph H Carpenter; Shoo K Lee; Arne Ohlsson
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Publication Detail:
Type:  Journal Article; Multicenter Study; Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural    
Journal Detail:
Title:  Pediatrics     Volume:  118     ISSN:  1098-4275     ISO Abbreviation:  Pediatrics     Publication Date:  2006 Nov 
Date Detail:
Created Date:  2006-11-02     Completed Date:  2006-11-14     Revised Date:  2007-11-14    
Medline Journal Info:
Nlm Unique ID:  0376422     Medline TA:  Pediatrics     Country:  United States    
Other Details:
Languages:  eng     Pagination:  e1328-35     Citation Subset:  AIM; IM    
Affiliation:
Neonatal Research Network, National Institute of Child Health and Human Development, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, Maryland, USA. michele.walsh@case.edu
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MeSH Terms
Descriptor/Qualifier:
Adrenal Cortex Hormones / therapeutic use*
Bronchopulmonary Dysplasia / drug therapy*
Drug Utilization / statistics & numerical data
Female
Humans
Infant, Newborn
Male
Retrospective Studies
Grant Support
ID/Acronym/Agency:
U01 HD36790/HD/NICHD NIH HHS; U10 HD21364/HD/NICHD NIH HHS; U10 HD21373/HD/NICHD NIH HHS; U10 HD21385/HD/NICHD NIH HHS; U10 HD21397/HD/NICHD NIH HHS; U10 HD27851/HD/NICHD NIH HHS; U10 HD27853/HD/NICHD NIH HHS; U10 HD27856/HD/NICHD NIH HHS; U10 HD27871/HD/NICHD NIH HHS; U10 HD27880/HD/NICHD NIH HHS; U10 HD27904/HD/NICHD NIH HHS; U10 HD34216/HD/NICHD NIH HHS
Chemical
Reg. No./Substance:
0/Adrenal Cortex Hormones

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