Document Detail


Challenge and promise: the role of miRNA for pathogenesis and progression of malignant melanoma.
MedLine Citation:
PMID:  22704085     Owner:  NLM     Status:  PubMed-not-MEDLINE    
Abstract/OtherAbstract:
microRNAs are endogenous noncoding RNAs that are implicated in gene regulation. More recently, miRNAs have been shown to play a pivotal role in multiple cellular processes that interfere with tumorigenesis. Here we summarize the essential role of microRNAs for human cancer with special focus on malignant melanoma and the promising perspectives for cancer therapies.
Authors:
Salma Essa; N Denzer; U Mahlknecht; R Klein; E M Collnot; J Reichrath
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Publication Detail:
Type:  Journal Article     Date:  2010-05-08
Journal Detail:
Title:  Clinical epigenetics     Volume:  1     ISSN:  1868-7083     ISO Abbreviation:  Clin Epigenetics     Publication Date:  2010 Sep 
Date Detail:
Created Date:  2012-06-18     Completed Date:  2012-10-02     Revised Date:  2013-03-01    
Medline Journal Info:
Nlm Unique ID:  101516977     Medline TA:  Clin Epigenetics     Country:  Germany    
Other Details:
Languages:  eng     Pagination:  7-11     Citation Subset:  -    
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