Document Detail


Cerebral sinus thrombosis in scleroderma: a case report.
MedLine Citation:
PMID:  22592580     Owner:  NLM     Status:  In-Data-Review    
Abstract/OtherAbstract:
Scleroderma or systemic sclerosis is a multisystem disease due to excessive collagen deposition in different organs and autoimmunity by production of autoantibodies.According to previous reports, brain is rarely affected in scleroderma, howeverrecent studies show central nervous system can be affect not only as a complication of systemic involvement (hypertension, renal failure) but also as a primary manifestation.In scleroderma, thrombus formation in central nervous system and peripheral systems is uncommonmay be due to endothelial cells damage which causes to release antithrombotic factors. We discuss a scleroderma patient with high titter of anticardiolipin antibody who developed to cerebral sinus thrombosis and cerebellum infarction. Then we review literature for both primary brain involvement and thrombotic event in systemic sclerosis.
Authors:
Maryam Poursadegh Fard; Sina Karami Magham
Publication Detail:
Type:  Journal Article    
Journal Detail:
Title:  Acta medica Iranica     Volume:  50     ISSN:  1735-9694     ISO Abbreviation:  Acta Med Iran     Publication Date:  2012 Apr 
Date Detail:
Created Date:  2012-05-17     Completed Date:  -     Revised Date:  -    
Medline Journal Info:
Nlm Unique ID:  14540050R     Medline TA:  Acta Med Iran     Country:  Iran    
Other Details:
Languages:  eng     Pagination:  288-91     Citation Subset:  IM    
Affiliation:
Department of Neurology, Nemazee Hospital, Shiraz University of Medical Sciences, Shiraz, Iran.
Export Citation:
APA/MLA Format     Download EndNote     Download BibTex
MeSH Terms
Descriptor/Qualifier:

From MEDLINE®/PubMed®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine


Previous Document:  Effects of educational intervention on long-lasting insecticidal nets use in a malarious area, south...
Next Document:  Concurrent peripheral pathologies and complex regional pain syndrome type 1 as contributors to acute...