Document Detail


Cerebral palsy and assisted conception.
MedLine Citation:
PMID:  22014781     Owner:  NLM     Status:  In-Data-Review    
Abstract/OtherAbstract:
Assisted reproductive technologies have been widely used over the past 30 years, and 1% to 4% of births worldwide are products of these technologies. However, adverse health outcomes related to assisted reproductive technologies, including cerebral palsy, have been reported. We extracted and reviewed all relevant studies cited by Medline from 1996 to 2010 evaluating the role of assisted reproductive technologies as a causative factor for cerebral palsy and poor long-term neurologic outcome. The research suggests that multiple pregnancy, preterm delivery, and babies small for gestational age are factors in the development of cerebral palsy. The vanishing embryo syndrome may also play a role. We review the evidence for these potentially causative factors, as well as their implications for embryo transfer policies.
Authors:
Natasha Ruth Saunders; Jonathan Hellmann; Dan Farine
Publication Detail:
Type:  Journal Article    
Journal Detail:
Title:  Journal of obstetrics and gynaecology Canada : JOGC = Journal d'obstétrique et gynécologie du Canada : JOGC     Volume:  33     ISSN:  1701-2163     ISO Abbreviation:  J Obstet Gynaecol Can     Publication Date:  2011 Oct 
Date Detail:
Created Date:  2011-10-21     Completed Date:  -     Revised Date:  -    
Medline Journal Info:
Nlm Unique ID:  101126664     Medline TA:  J Obstet Gynaecol Can     Country:  Canada    
Other Details:
Languages:  eng     Pagination:  1038-43     Citation Subset:  IM    
Affiliation:
Department of Paediatrics, Hospital for Sick Children and Faculty of Medicine, University of Toronto, Toronto ON.
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