Document Detail


Central fetal monitoring: effect on perinatal outcomes and cesarean section rate.
MedLine Citation:
PMID:  17150066     Owner:  NLM     Status:  MEDLINE    
Abstract/OtherAbstract:
BACKGROUND: In a trend similar to continuous electronic fetal monitoring, many hospitals are incorporating central fetal monitoring into labor and delivery suites. The objective of this study was to investigate whether the use of central fetal monitoring had an effect on neonatal outcomes or cesarean section rate. METHODS: This retrospective study involved patient data from deliveries occurring at Women and Children's Hospital of Buffalo, Buffalo, New York, between the years 2000 and 2003. In the period from January 1, 2000, to December 31, 2001, central fetal monitoring was available, whereas in the period from February 1, 2002, to December 31, 2003, it was unavailable. Data on deliveries at Women and Children's Hospital of Buffalo were obtained using the Western New York Perinatal Data System, which is an electronic data set based on birth certificate information. The method of delivery, admission to the neonatal intensive care unit, and 5-minute Apgar scores less than 7 were compared for deliveries occurring with and without the use of central fetal monitoring. These outcomes were further subdivided into full-term and preterm deliveries. RESULTS: Three thousand five hundred and twelve deliveries used central monitoring and 3,007 deliveries did not. For full-term deliveries, in the years with central fetal monitoring compared with the years without it, no differences in the cesarean section rate (13.4 vs 14.5%, not significant [NS]), the admission rate in neonatal intensive care unit (3.3 vs 3.3%, NS), or the incidence of Apgar score less than 7 (0.6 vs 0.5%, NS) were observed. For preterm deliveries, comparing the years with central fetal monitoring with the years without, no differences in the cesarean section rate (21.3 vs 21.3%, NS), the admission rate in neonatal intensive care unit (17.7 vs 20.1%, NS), or the incidence of Apgar score less than 7 (7.0 vs 6.5%, NS) were observed. Analyses pooling all deliveries also failed to show any differences in any of the parameters. CONCLUSIONS: No statistically significant difference was demonstrated in the rates of cesarean section, admission to the neonatal intensive care unit, or incidence of Apgar scores of less than 7 associated with the use of central fetal monitoring. Therefore, we could not identify any benefit to the use of central fetal heart rate monitoring.
Authors:
Matthew Withiam-Leitch; James Shelton; Emily Fleming
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Publication Detail:
Type:  Journal Article; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't    
Journal Detail:
Title:  Birth (Berkeley, Calif.)     Volume:  33     ISSN:  0730-7659     ISO Abbreviation:  Birth     Publication Date:  2006 Dec 
Date Detail:
Created Date:  2006-12-07     Completed Date:  2007-07-12     Revised Date:  -    
Medline Journal Info:
Nlm Unique ID:  8302042     Medline TA:  Birth     Country:  United States    
Other Details:
Languages:  eng     Pagination:  284-8     Citation Subset:  IM    
Affiliation:
Division of General Obstetrics and Gynecology, University at Buffalo, Women and Children's Hospital of Buffalo, Buffalo, New York 14222, USA.
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MeSH Terms
Descriptor/Qualifier:
Adolescent
Adult
Apgar Score
Cesarean Section / statistics & numerical data*
Delivery, Obstetric / methods*,  statistics & numerical data
Female
Fetal Monitoring / methods*,  statistics & numerical data
Heart Rate, Fetal
Humans
Infant Mortality
Infant, Newborn
Intensive Care, Neonatal / statistics & numerical data
Middle Aged
Perinatal Care* / methods,  statistics & numerical data
Pregnancy
Pregnancy Outcome*
Retrospective Studies

From MEDLINE®/PubMed®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine


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