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Causal ACTH-Depot Therapy during Pregnancies following Infertility Treatment.
MedLine Citation:
PMID:  22666262     Owner:  NLM     Status:  PubMed-not-MEDLINE    
Abstract/OtherAbstract:
The aim of this paper was to confirm the efficacy of adrenocorticotropin depot (ACTH-depot) therapy in pregnancies with threatened miscarriage and preterm delivery through the desired stimulation of the adrenal glands controlled by the rest of organism. The activity of hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis plays a key role in pregnancy. Such naturally stimulated endogenous corticosteroid hormones are free from unwanted side effects of their synthetics analogs. Low level of maternal blood ACTH and insufficient increase of induced by hypothalamic hormones oxytocinases (cystine-β-aminopeptidases) were indication to ACTH-depot therapy (0.5 mg/week) in our consecutive prospective studies. Contrary to antenatal use of synthetic corticosteroids, there are no temporal limits of this therapy, which has to be more often recommended into clinical prevention of fetal morbidity, treatment of premature delivery, and finally elimination of the newborn's mortality caused by the neuroendocrinological gestoses.
Authors:
Rudolf Klimek; Marek Klimek; Peter Gralek; Dariusz Jasiczek
Publication Detail:
Type:  Journal Article     Date:  2012-05-15
Journal Detail:
Title:  Obstetrics and gynecology international     Volume:  2012     ISSN:  1687-9597     ISO Abbreviation:  Obstet Gynecol Int     Publication Date:  2012  
Date Detail:
Created Date:  2012-06-05     Completed Date:  2012-08-23     Revised Date:  2013-02-28    
Medline Journal Info:
Nlm Unique ID:  101517078     Medline TA:  Obstet Gynecol Int     Country:  United States    
Other Details:
Languages:  eng     Pagination:  248926     Citation Subset:  -    
Affiliation:
Fertility Centre Cracow, Plac Szczepański 3, 31-011 Cracow, Poland.
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