Document Detail


Cast and splint immobilization: complications.
MedLine Citation:
PMID:  18180390     Owner:  NLM     Status:  MEDLINE    
Abstract/OtherAbstract:
During the past three decades, internal fixation has become increasingly popular for fracture management and limb reconstruction. As a result, during their training, orthopaedic surgeons receive less formal instruction in the art of extremity immobilization and cast application and removal. Casting is not without risks and complications (eg, stiffness, pressure sores, compartment syndrome); the risk of morbidity is higher when casts are applied by less experienced practitioners. Certain materials and methods of ideal cast and splint application are recommended to prevent morbidity in the patient who is at high risk for complications with casting and splinting. Those at high risk include the obtunded or comatose multitrauma patient, the patient under anesthesia, the very young patient, the developmentally delayed patient, and the patient with spasticity.
Authors:
Matthew Halanski; Kenneth J Noonan
Publication Detail:
Type:  Journal Article; Review    
Journal Detail:
Title:  The Journal of the American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons     Volume:  16     ISSN:  1067-151X     ISO Abbreviation:  J Am Acad Orthop Surg     Publication Date:  2008 Jan 
Date Detail:
Created Date:  2008-01-08     Completed Date:  2008-02-28     Revised Date:  -    
Medline Journal Info:
Nlm Unique ID:  9417468     Medline TA:  J Am Acad Orthop Surg     Country:  United States    
Other Details:
Languages:  eng     Pagination:  30-40     Citation Subset:  IM    
Affiliation:
Helen DeVos Children's Hospital, Grand Rapids, MI, USA.
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MeSH Terms
Descriptor/Qualifier:
Casts, Surgical / adverse effects*
Compartment Syndromes / etiology
Contracture / etiology
Fracture Fixation / adverse effects,  methods
Humans
Paralysis / etiology
Skin Diseases / etiology
Splints / adverse effects*

From MEDLINE®/PubMed®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine


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