Document Detail


Carry-over effects of the larval environment on post-metamorphic performance in two hylid frogs.
MedLine Citation:
PMID:  20658150     Owner:  NLM     Status:  In-Process    
Abstract/OtherAbstract:
Life history theory and empirical studies suggest that large size or earlier metamorphosis are suitable proxies for increased lifetime fitness. Thus, across a gradient of larval habitat quality, individuals with similar phenotypes for these traits should exhibit similar post-metamorphic performance. Here we examine this paradigm by testing for differences in post-metamorphic growth and survival independent of metamorphic size in a temperate (spring peeper, Pseudacris crucifer) and tropical (red-eyed treefrog, Agalychnis callidryas) anuran reared under differing larval conditions. For spring peepers, increased food in the larval environment increased post-metamorphic growth efficiency more than predicted by metamorphic phenotype and led to increased mass. Similarly, red-eyed treefrogs reared at low larval density ended the experiment at a higher mass than predicted by metamorphic phenotype. These results show that larval environments can have delayed effects not captured by examining only metamorphic phenotype. These delayed effects for the larval environment link larval and juvenile life history stages and could be important in the population dynamics of organisms with complex life cycles.
Authors:
Benjamin G Van Allen; Venetia S Briggs; Michael W McCoy; James R Vonesh
Publication Detail:
Type:  Journal Article; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't; Research Support, U.S. Gov't, Non-P.H.S.     Date:  2010-07-24
Journal Detail:
Title:  Oecologia     Volume:  164     ISSN:  1432-1939     ISO Abbreviation:  Oecologia     Publication Date:  2010 Dec 
Date Detail:
Created Date:  2010-11-16     Completed Date:  -     Revised Date:  -    
Medline Journal Info:
Nlm Unique ID:  0150372     Medline TA:  Oecologia     Country:  Germany    
Other Details:
Languages:  eng     Pagination:  891-8     Citation Subset:  IM    
Affiliation:
Department of Biology, Virginia Commonwealth University, Richmond, VA, USA. bengvanallen@gmail.com
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