Document Detail


Cardiovascular responses and neurotransmission in the ventrolateral medulla during skeletal muscle contraction following transient middle cerebral artery occlusion and reperfusion.
MedLine Citation:
PMID:  12376178     Owner:  NLM     Status:  MEDLINE    
Abstract/OtherAbstract:
We hypothesized that static skeletal muscle contraction-induced systemic cardiovascular responses, and central glutamate/GABA release in rostral (RVLM) and caudal ventrolateral medulla (CVLM), would be modulated by cerebral ischemia. In sham-operated rats, a 2-min tibial nerve stimulation induced static contraction of the triceps surae, evoked pressor responses, increased glutamate in both the RVLM and CVLM, decreased GABA in the CVLM, and increased GABA in the RVLM. In rats with a temporary 90-min left middle cerebral artery occlusion (MCAO) followed by 24 h reperfusion, pressor responses during muscle contractions were attenuated, as were glutamate within the left RVLM and left CVLM. Glutamate within the right RVLM and right CVLM were unaltered and similar to those in sham rats. In contrast, GABA increases during muscle contractions were enhanced in the left RVLM and CVLM but changes within the right CVLM and RVLM were similar to those in sham rats. These results indicate that unilateral ischemia increases ipsilateral GABA/glutamate ratios during muscle contraction in the RVLM. In contrast, opposite changes in ipsilateral glutamate and GABA release within the RVLM and CVLM were observed following a 90-min right-sided MCAO followed by 24 h reperfusion. However, cardiovascular responses during muscle contraction were depressed following such an ischemic brain injury. These data suggest that transient ischemic brain injury attenuates cardiovascular responses to static exercise via modulating neurotransmission within the ventrolateral medulla.
Authors:
Ahmmed Ally; Surya M Nauli; Timothy J Maher
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Publication Detail:
Type:  Journal Article; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't    
Journal Detail:
Title:  Brain research     Volume:  952     ISSN:  0006-8993     ISO Abbreviation:  Brain Res.     Publication Date:  2002 Oct 
Date Detail:
Created Date:  2002-10-11     Completed Date:  2003-01-07     Revised Date:  2006-11-15    
Medline Journal Info:
Nlm Unique ID:  0045503     Medline TA:  Brain Res     Country:  Netherlands    
Other Details:
Languages:  eng     Pagination:  176-87     Citation Subset:  IM    
Affiliation:
Department of Physiology, Center for Perinatal Biology, Loma Linda University School of Medicine, Loma Linda, CA 92350, USA. ally@som.llu.edu
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MeSH Terms
Descriptor/Qualifier:
Animals
Cardiovascular System / physiopathology*
Female
Glutamic Acid / metabolism*,  secretion
Infarction, Middle Cerebral Artery / metabolism*,  physiopathology
Medulla Oblongata / metabolism*,  physiopathology,  secretion
Muscle Contraction / physiology*
Muscle, Skeletal / metabolism*,  secretion
Rats
Rats, Sprague-Dawley
Reperfusion / methods
gamma-Aminobutyric Acid / metabolism*,  secretion
Chemical
Reg. No./Substance:
56-12-2/gamma-Aminobutyric Acid; 56-86-0/Glutamic Acid

From MEDLINE®/PubMed®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine


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