Document Detail


Cardiovascular and pulmonary responses to increased acceleration forces during rest and exercise.
MedLine Citation:
PMID:  22606865     Owner:  NLM     Status:  In-Process    
Abstract/OtherAbstract:
BACKGROUND: The reduced cardiac output (CO) secondary to increased acceleration forces (+Gz) has applicability to daily life and pathophysiology. Increased +Gz and reduced CO affect the lung, resulting in reduced oxygen transport. A variety of studies have examined tolerance to high +Gz.
METHODS: The present study examines the effect of +1 to +3 Gz on steady-state cardiopulmonary variables at rest and while exercising at +2 Gz and +3 Gz. This study also looks at the deterioration of steady-state cardiopulmonary variables with sustained increased +Gz and after de-training in eight male centrifuge trained subjects.
RESULTS: CO (-1.53 L x min(-1)/+Gz), stroke volume (-30 ml/+Gz, SV), and pulmonary diffusing capacity (-3.42 ml x mmHg(-1)/+Gz, DL(co)) decreased linearly with increased +Gz at rest while heart rate (23 bpm/+Gz, HR), total peripheral resistance (0.0095 TPRU/Gz TPR), mean arterial pressure (13.2 mmHg/+Gz, MAP), and ventilation (4.13 L x min(-1)/+Gz, V(E)) increased linearly. During graded exercise, CO and SV increased less at +2 Gz and +3 Gz while MAP and VE increased more. Failure to endure increased +Gz and the effects of de-training were primarily due to the inability to regulate MAP.
DISCUSSION: The incremental increase in increased +Gz from 1 to 3 resulted in increased MAP, which was accomplished by increasing TPR sufficiently so as to offset the reduced CO. The effects of increased +Gz and reduced CO compromised lung function and oxygen transport (-18-30%), thus compromising exercise capacity. The failure to regulate MAP at lower increased +Gz levels resulted in intolerance to higher increased +Gz.
Authors:
David R Pendergast; Albert Olszowka; Leon E Farhi
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Publication Detail:
Type:  Journal Article; Research Support, U.S. Gov't, Non-P.H.S.    
Journal Detail:
Title:  Aviation, space, and environmental medicine     Volume:  83     ISSN:  0095-6562     ISO Abbreviation:  Aviat Space Environ Med     Publication Date:  2012 May 
Date Detail:
Created Date:  2012-05-21     Completed Date:  -     Revised Date:  -    
Medline Journal Info:
Nlm Unique ID:  7501714     Medline TA:  Aviat Space Environ Med     Country:  United States    
Other Details:
Languages:  eng     Pagination:  488-95     Citation Subset:  IM; S    
Affiliation:
Center for Research and Education in Special Environments, Department of Physiology and Biophysics, School of Medicine and Biomedical Sciences, University at Buffalo, 124 Sherman Hall, Buffalo, NY 14214, USA. dpenderg@buffalo.edu
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