Document Detail


Cardiogenesis from human embryonic stem cells.
MedLine Citation:
PMID:  21084757     Owner:  NLM     Status:  MEDLINE    
Abstract/OtherAbstract:
Over the past decade, the ability to culture and differentiate human embryonic stem cells (ESCs) has offered researchers a novel therapeutic that may, for the first time, repair regions of the damaged heart. Studies of cardiac development in lower organisms have led to identification of the transforming growth factor-β superfamily (eg, activin A and bone morphogenic protein 4) and the Wnt/β-catenin pathway as key inducers of mesoderm and cardiovascular differentiation. These factors act in a context-specific manner (eg, Wnt/β-catenin is required initially to form mesoderm but must be antagonized thereafter to make cardiac muscle). Different lines of ESCs produce different levels of agonists and antagonists for these pathways, but with careful optimization, highly enriched populations of immature cardiomyocytes can be generated. These cardiomyocytes survive transplantation to infarcted hearts of experimental animals, where they create new human myocardial tissue and improve heart function. The grafts generated by cell transplantation have been small, however, leading to an exploration of tissue engineering as an alternate strategy. Engineered tissue generated from preparations of human cardiomyocytes survives poorly after transplantation, most likely because of ischemia. Creation of pre-organized vascular networks in the tissue markedly enhances survival, with human capillaries anastomosed to the host coronary circulation. Thus, pathways controlling formation of the human cardiovascular system are emerging, yielding the building blocks for tissue regeneration that may address the root causes of heart failure.
Authors:
John L Mignone; Kareen L Kreutziger; Sharon L Paige; Charles E Murry
Related Documents :
15505867 - Two-year clinical follow-up results of intracoronary radiation therapy with rhenium-188...
1634687 - Coronary intimal proliferation after balloon injury and stenting in swine: an animal mo...
16483337 - Sirolimus-versus paclitaxel-eluting stents: a comparison of two consecutive series in r...
7782677 - Percutaneous interventions for ischemic heart disease.
24771437 - Circadian changes in cardiac rhythm structure in decompensated chronic heart failure.
10519467 - A meta-analysis of psychoeduational programs for coronary heart disease patients.
Publication Detail:
Type:  Journal Article; Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural     Date:  2010-11-12
Journal Detail:
Title:  Circulation journal : official journal of the Japanese Circulation Society     Volume:  74     ISSN:  1347-4820     ISO Abbreviation:  Circ. J.     Publication Date:  2010 Nov 
Date Detail:
Created Date:  2010-12-02     Completed Date:  2011-03-09     Revised Date:  2014-04-23    
Medline Journal Info:
Nlm Unique ID:  101137683     Medline TA:  Circ J     Country:  Japan    
Other Details:
Languages:  eng     Pagination:  2517-26     Citation Subset:  IM    
Export Citation:
APA/MLA Format     Download EndNote     Download BibTex
MeSH Terms
Descriptor/Qualifier:
Animals
Cell Differentiation*
Cell Hypoxia
Cell Line
Cell Survival
Coronary Circulation
Embryonic Stem Cells / cytology,  metabolism*,  transplantation
Humans
Myocardial Infarction / metabolism,  therapy
Myocardium / cytology,  metabolism*
Myocytes, Cardiac / cytology,  metabolism*,  transplantation
Stem Cell Transplantation
Tissue Engineering / methods*
Grant Support
ID/Acronym/Agency:
P01 GM081619/GM/NIGMS NIH HHS; P01 HL094374/HL/NHLBI NIH HHS; P01GM81619/GM/NIGMS NIH HHS; P01HL094374/HL/NHLBI NIH HHS; R01 HL084642/HL/NHLBI NIH HHS; R01HL084642/HL/NHLBI NIH HHS; R01HL64387/HL/NHLBI NIH HHS; T32 HL007828/HL/NHLBI NIH HHS; U01HL100405/HL/NHLBI NIH HHS; U24DK076126/DK/NIDDK NIH HHS
Comments/Corrections

From MEDLINE®/PubMed®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine


Previous Document:  Is angioplasty able to become the gold standard of treatment beyond bypass surgery for patients with...
Next Document:  Role of cellular senescence in lifestyle-related disease.