Document Detail


Carbon monoxide-related deaths in a metropolitan county in the USA: an 11-year study.
MedLine Citation:
PMID:  15749357     Owner:  NLM     Status:  MEDLINE    
Abstract/OtherAbstract:
Carbon monoxide (CO) poisoning as a cause of death is well documented in industrialized countries. The objective of this study was to compare demographic data in deaths due to accidents (in fires) and suicides in the same population between 1988 and 1998. Furthermore, the potential effect of a community wide education effort regarding safety in the home was assessed. Postmortem reports were reviewed for all deaths examined at the Office of the Cuyahoga County Coroner in Cleveland, OH, USA. During the study period, there were 209 accidental deaths due to fires in the home (6.5% of all accidents in the home) and 182 CO deaths by suicide (9.8% of all suicides). Demographic characteristics of the two groups differed: while males represented the majority of cases in both groups (55% of accidents, 70% suicides), race specific death rates were higher for whites than blacks (18/100,000 white, 3/100,000 black) in suicides compared with 29/100,000 deaths for blacks and 11/100,000 for whites in accidental cases. Fire deaths were prevalent in the young (0-9 years) and old (>60) whereas in the suicide group the age specific death rate was highest for those over 70 years. The majority of fire deaths occurred in the city of Cleveland but suicides were prevalent in the suburbs. More fire deaths occurred in December than any other month whereas more suicides occurred in April. In 1992, there was a community wide effort to provide free smoke detectors to residents in Cleveland. In 1992, there were 4.2/100,000 fire deaths in the city. This decreased to 0.6/100,000 in 1996, increased to 1.2/100,000 in 1997 followed by a decrease to 0.8/100,000 in 1998. This suggested that the program may have aided in decreasing these types of deaths. Deaths due to fires in the suburbs were <1/100,000 throughout the study period.
Authors:
Cynthia D Homer; David A Engelhart; Eric S Lavins; Amanda J Jenkins
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Publication Detail:
Type:  Comparative Study; Journal Article    
Journal Detail:
Title:  Forensic science international     Volume:  149     ISSN:  0379-0738     ISO Abbreviation:  Forensic Sci. Int.     Publication Date:  2005 May 
Date Detail:
Created Date:  2005-03-07     Completed Date:  2005-05-26     Revised Date:  2006-11-15    
Medline Journal Info:
Nlm Unique ID:  7902034     Medline TA:  Forensic Sci Int     Country:  Ireland    
Other Details:
Languages:  eng     Pagination:  159-65     Citation Subset:  IM    
Affiliation:
John Carroll University, 20700 North Park Boulevard, University Heights, OH 44118, USA.
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MeSH Terms
Descriptor/Qualifier:
Accidents, Home / statistics & numerical data
Adolescent
Adult
Age Distribution
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Carbon Monoxide Poisoning / mortality*
Child
Child, Preschool
Continental Population Groups / statistics & numerical data
Female
Fires / statistics & numerical data
Forensic Medicine
Humans
Infant
Infant, Newborn
Male
Middle Aged
Ohio / epidemiology
Retrospective Studies
Seasons
Sex Distribution
Suburban Population*
Suicide / statistics & numerical data
Urban Population*

From MEDLINE®/PubMed®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine


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