Document Detail


Carbohydrate loading and metabolism during exercise in men and women.
MedLine Citation:
PMID:  7615443     Owner:  NLM     Status:  MEDLINE    
Abstract/OtherAbstract:
During endurance exercise at approximately 65% maximal O2 consumption, women oxidize more lipids, and therefore decrease carbohydrate and protein oxidation, compared with men (L.J. Tarnopolsky, M.A. Tarnopolsky, S.A. Atkinson, and J.D. MacDougall. J. Appl. Physiol. 68: 302-308, 1990; S.M. Phillips, S.A. Atkinson, M.A. Tarnopolsky, and J.D. MacDougall. J. Appl. Physiol. 75: 2134-2141, 1993). The main purpose of this study was to examine the ability of similarly trained male (n = 7) and female (n = 8) endurance athletes to increase muscle glycogen concentrations in response to an increase in dietary carbohydrate from 55-60 to 75% of energy intake for a period of 4 days (carbohydrate loading). In addition, we sought to examine whether gender differences existed in metabolism during submaximal endurance cycling at 75% peak O2 consumption (VO2 peak) for 60 min. The men increased muscle glycogen concentration by 41% in response to the dietary manipulation and had a corresponding increase in performance time during an 85% VO2 peak trial (45%), whereas the women did not increase glycogen concentration (0%) or performance time (5%). The women oxidized significantly more lipid and less carbohydrate and protein compared with the men during exercise at 75% VO2-peak. We conclude that women did not increase muscle glycogen in response to the 4-day regimen of carbohydrate loading described. In addition, these data support previous observations of greater lipid and lower carbohydrate and protein oxidation by women vs. men during submaximal endurance exercise.
Authors:
M A Tarnopolsky; S A Atkinson; S M Phillips; J D MacDougall
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Publication Detail:
Type:  Comparative Study; Journal Article; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't    
Journal Detail:
Title:  Journal of applied physiology (Bethesda, Md. : 1985)     Volume:  78     ISSN:  8750-7587     ISO Abbreviation:  J. Appl. Physiol.     Publication Date:  1995 Apr 
Date Detail:
Created Date:  1995-08-18     Completed Date:  1995-08-18     Revised Date:  2013-09-26    
Medline Journal Info:
Nlm Unique ID:  8502536     Medline TA:  J Appl Physiol (1985)     Country:  UNITED STATES    
Other Details:
Languages:  eng     Pagination:  1360-8     Citation Subset:  IM    
Affiliation:
Department of Pediatrics, McMaster University Medical Center, Hamilton, Ontario, Canada.
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MeSH Terms
Descriptor/Qualifier:
Adult
Biopsy
Blood Glucose / metabolism
Dietary Carbohydrates / administration & dosage*,  metabolism
Exercise / physiology*
Fatty Acids, Nonesterified / blood
Female
Glycogen / metabolism*
Humans
Male
Muscle, Skeletal / metabolism*
Oxygen Consumption
Physical Endurance / physiology
Potassium / blood
Respiratory Function Tests
Sex Factors
Urea / blood,  urine*
Chemical
Reg. No./Substance:
0/Blood Glucose; 0/Dietary Carbohydrates; 0/Fatty Acids, Nonesterified; 57-13-6/Urea; 7440-09-7/Potassium; 9005-79-2/Glycogen

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