Document Detail


Cannibalism, food limitation, intraspecific competition, and the regulation of spider populations.
MedLine Citation:
PMID:  16332219     Owner:  NLM     Status:  MEDLINE    
Abstract/OtherAbstract:
Cannibalism among generalist predators has implications for the dynamics of terrestrial food webs. Spiders are common, ubiquitous arthropod generalist predators in most natural and managed terrestrial ecosystems. Thus, the relationship of spider cannibalism to food limitation, competition, and population regulation has direct bearing on basic ecological theory and applications such as biological control. This review first briefly treats the different types of spider cannibalism and then focuses in more depth on evidence relating cannibalism to population dynamics and food web interactions to address the following questions: Is cannibalism in spiders a foraging strategy that helps to overcome the effects of a limited supply of calories and/or nutrients? Does cannibalism in spiders reduce competition for prey? Is cannibalism a significant density-dependent factor in spider population dynamics? Does cannibalism dampen spider-initiated trophic cascades?
Authors:
David H Wise
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Publication Detail:
Type:  Journal Article; Review    
Journal Detail:
Title:  Annual review of entomology     Volume:  51     ISSN:  0066-4170     ISO Abbreviation:  Annu. Rev. Entomol.     Publication Date:  2006  
Date Detail:
Created Date:  2005-12-07     Completed Date:  2006-08-03     Revised Date:  2008-11-21    
Medline Journal Info:
Nlm Unique ID:  0372367     Medline TA:  Annu Rev Entomol     Country:  United States    
Other Details:
Languages:  eng     Pagination:  441-65     Citation Subset:  IM    
Affiliation:
Department of Entomology, University of Kentucky, Lexington, 40546-0091, USA. dhwise@uky.edu
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MeSH Terms
Descriptor/Qualifier:
Animals
Body Size / physiology
Cannibalism*
Competitive Behavior*
Ecosystem
Environment
Female
Food Chain
Food Microbiology
Food Supply*
Hunger
Male
Nutritional Physiological Phenomena
Population Control
Population Dynamics
Sexual Behavior, Animal / physiology
Social Behavior
Spiders / physiology*

From MEDLINE®/PubMed®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine


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