Document Detail


Cannabis affects people differently: inter-subject variation in the psychotogenic effects of Δ9-tetrahydrocannabinol: a functional magnetic resonance imaging study with healthy volunteers.
MedLine Citation:
PMID:  23020923     Owner:  NLM     Status:  MEDLINE    
Abstract/OtherAbstract:
BACKGROUND: Cannabis can induce transient psychotic symptoms, but not all users experience these adverse effects. We compared the neural response to Δ9-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC) in healthy volunteers in whom the drug did or did not induce acute psychotic symptoms. Method In a double-blind, placebo-controlled, pseudorandomized design, 21 healthy men with minimal experience of cannabis were given either 10 mg THC or placebo, orally. Behavioural and functional magnetic resonance imaging measures were then recorded whilst they performed a go/no-go task.
RESULTS: The sample was subdivided on the basis of the Positive and Negative Syndrome Scale positive score following administration of THC into transiently psychotic (TP; n = 11) and non-psychotic (NP; n = 10) groups. During the THC condition, TP subjects made more frequent inhibition errors than the NP group and showed differential activation relative to the NP group in the left parahippocampal gyrus, the left and right middle temporal gyri and in the right cerebellum. In these regions, THC had opposite effects on activation relative to placebo in the two groups. The TP group also showed less activation than the NP group in the right middle temporal gyrus and cerebellum, independent of the effects of THC.
CONCLUSIONS: In this first demonstration of inter-subject variability in sensitivity to the psychotogenic effects of THC, we found that the presence of acute psychotic symptoms was associated with a differential effect of THC on activation in the ventral and medial temporal cortex and cerebellum, suggesting that these regions mediate the effects of the drug on psychotic symptoms.
Authors:
Z Atakan; S Bhattacharyya; P Allen; R Martín-Santos; J A Crippa; S J Borgwardt; P Fusar-Poli; M Seal; H Sallis; D Stahl; A W Zuardi; K Rubia; P McGuire
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Publication Detail:
Type:  Journal Article; Randomized Controlled Trial; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't     Date:  2012-10-01
Journal Detail:
Title:  Psychological medicine     Volume:  43     ISSN:  1469-8978     ISO Abbreviation:  Psychol Med     Publication Date:  2013 Jun 
Date Detail:
Created Date:  2013-04-30     Completed Date:  2013-12-26     Revised Date:  2014-03-14    
Medline Journal Info:
Nlm Unique ID:  1254142     Medline TA:  Psychol Med     Country:  England    
Other Details:
Languages:  eng     Pagination:  1255-67     Citation Subset:  IM    
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MeSH Terms
Descriptor/Qualifier:
Adult
Brain / drug effects*,  physiopathology
Cerebellum / drug effects,  physiopathology
Double-Blind Method
Dronabinol / pharmacology*
Functional Neuroimaging
Hallucinogens / pharmacology*
Healthy Volunteers
Humans
Magnetic Resonance Imaging
Male
Parahippocampal Gyrus / drug effects,  physiopathology
Psychoses, Substance-Induced / etiology*,  physiopathology
Temporal Lobe / drug effects,  physiopathology
Young Adult
Grant Support
ID/Acronym/Agency:
G0501775//Medical Research Council; NIHR-CS-011-001//Department of Health
Chemical
Reg. No./Substance:
0/Hallucinogens; 7J8897W37S/Dronabinol

From MEDLINE®/PubMed®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine


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