Document Detail


Cancer-induced oxidative stress and pain.
MedLine Citation:
PMID:  24293110     Owner:  NLM     Status:  In-Data-Review    
Abstract/OtherAbstract:
Cancer pain is a well-documented and prevalent healthcare problem, with current treatment strategies often failing to achieve acceptable efficacy. One of the major difficulties in treating cancer pain owes to the complex interplay between the cancer microenvironment, cancer therapy, and the body's own responses to these biochemical changes. A better understanding of the molecular pathways of nociception that are activated during cancer progression and treatment is necessary for better pain management and increased quality of life. This article reviews the current research that implicates oxidative stress as an important target for attenuating cancer pain. Sources of oxidative stress are first established, followed by a discussion of the various pathways that are affected by oxidative stress and that ultimately cause cancer pain.
Authors:
Mina G Nashed; Matthew D Balenko; Gurmit Singh
Publication Detail:
Type:  Journal Article    
Journal Detail:
Title:  Current pain and headache reports     Volume:  18     ISSN:  1534-3081     ISO Abbreviation:  Curr Pain Headache Rep     Publication Date:  2014 Jan 
Date Detail:
Created Date:  2013-12-02     Completed Date:  -     Revised Date:  -    
Medline Journal Info:
Nlm Unique ID:  100970666     Medline TA:  Curr Pain Headache Rep     Country:  United States    
Other Details:
Languages:  eng     Pagination:  384     Citation Subset:  IM    
Affiliation:
Department of Pathology & Molecular Medicine, McMaster University, Lab 4 N48 Health Sciences Building, McMaster University, 1280 Main St W, Hamilton, ON, L8S 4 L8, Canada, nashedm@mcmaster.ca.
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