Document Detail


Bubble-driven light-absorbing hydrogel microrobot for the assembly of bio-objects.
MedLine Citation:
PMID:  24110933     Owner:  NLM     Status:  Publisher    
Abstract/OtherAbstract:
Microrobots made of light-absorbing hydrogel material were actuated by optically induced thermocapillary flow and move at up to 700 µm/s. The micro-assembly capabilities of the microrobots were demonstrated by assembling polystyrene beads and yeast cells into various patterns on standard glass microscope slides. Two microrobots operating independently in parallel were also used to assemble micro-hydrogel structures.
Authors:
Wenqi Hu; Qihui Fan; Wade Tonaki; Aaron T Ohta
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Publication Detail:
Type:  JOURNAL ARTICLE    
Journal Detail:
Title:  Conference proceedings : ... Annual International Conference of the IEEE Engineering in Medicine and Biology Society. IEEE Engineering in Medicine and Biology Society. Conference     Volume:  2013     ISSN:  1557-170X     ISO Abbreviation:  Conf Proc IEEE Eng Med Biol Soc     Publication Date:  2013 Jul 
Date Detail:
Created Date:  2013-10-10     Completed Date:  -     Revised Date:  -    
Medline Journal Info:
Nlm Unique ID:  101243413     Medline TA:  Conf Proc IEEE Eng Med Biol Soc     Country:  -    
Other Details:
Languages:  ENG     Pagination:  5303-5306     Citation Subset:  -    
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