Document Detail


Breaking up prolonged sitting with light-intensity walking improves postprandial glycemia, but breaking up sitting with standing does not.
MedLine Citation:
PMID:  24704421     Owner:  NLM     Status:  Publisher    
Abstract/OtherAbstract:
OBJECTIVES: To explore the effects of breaking up prolonged sitting time with standing or light-intensity walking on a range of cardiometabolic risk markers.
DESIGN: A randomised three-period, three-treatment acute crossover trial.
METHODS: Ten non-obese adults took part in three trials: (1) uninterrupted sitting; (2) seated with 2-min bouts of standing every 20min; and (3) seated with 2-min bouts of light-intensity walking every 20min. Two standardised test drinks (total 80.3 carbohydrate, 50g fat) were provided after an initial 1-h period of uninterrupted sitting. Plasma glucose and blood pressure were assessed hourly to calculate area under the curve. Total cholesterol, HDL, and triglycerides were assessed at baseline and 5-h. ANOVAs were used to explore between-trial differences.
RESULTS: Glucose area under the curve was lower in the activity-break condition compared to the uninterrupted sitting and standing-break conditions: mean area under the curve 18.5 (95% CI 17, 20), 22.0 (20.5, 23.5), and 22.2 (20.7, 23.7) mmolL/5-h, respectively, p<0.001; no difference between uninterrupted sitting and standing-break conditions (p>0.05). Systolic and diastolic blood pressure area under the curve did not differ significantly between conditions, nor did responses in lipid parameters (p>0.05).
CONCLUSIONS: This study suggests that interrupting sitting time with frequent brief bouts of light-intensity activity, but not standing, imparts beneficial postprandial responses that may enhance cardiometabolic health. These findings may have importance in the design of effective interventions to reduce cardiometabolic disease risk.
Authors:
Daniel P Bailey; Christopher D Locke
Publication Detail:
Type:  JOURNAL ARTICLE     Date:  2014-3-20
Journal Detail:
Title:  Journal of science and medicine in sport / Sports Medicine Australia     Volume:  -     ISSN:  1878-1861     ISO Abbreviation:  J Sci Med Sport     Publication Date:  2014 Mar 
Date Detail:
Created Date:  2014-4-7     Completed Date:  -     Revised Date:  -    
Medline Journal Info:
Nlm Unique ID:  9812598     Medline TA:  J Sci Med Sport     Country:  -    
Other Details:
Languages:  ENG     Pagination:  -     Citation Subset:  -    
Copyright Information:
Copyright © 2014 Sports Medicine Australia. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.
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