Document Detail


Bonobos voluntarily share their own food with others.
MedLine Citation:
PMID:  20219170     Owner:  NLM     Status:  MEDLINE    
Abstract/OtherAbstract:
Comparisons between chimpanzees and humans have led to the hypothesis that only humans voluntarily share their own food with others. However, it is hard to draw conclusions because the food-sharing preferences of our more tolerant relative, the bonobo (Pan paniscus), have never been studied experimentally. We gave unrelated bonobos the choice of either monopolizing food or actively sharing: we found that bonobos preferred to release a recipient from an adjacent room and feed together instead of eating all the food alone. Thus, food sharing in bonobos does not depend on kinship or harassment and suggests our own species' propensity for voluntary food sharing is not unique among the apes.
Authors:
Brian Hare; Suzy Kwetuenda
Publication Detail:
Type:  Letter; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't; Research Support, U.S. Gov't, Non-P.H.S.    
Journal Detail:
Title:  Current biology : CB     Volume:  20     ISSN:  1879-0445     ISO Abbreviation:  Curr. Biol.     Publication Date:  2010 Mar 
Date Detail:
Created Date:  2010-03-11     Completed Date:  2010-07-05     Revised Date:  -    
Medline Journal Info:
Nlm Unique ID:  9107782     Medline TA:  Curr Biol     Country:  England    
Other Details:
Languages:  eng     Pagination:  R230-1     Citation Subset:  IM    
Affiliation:
Department of Evolutionary Anthropology & Center for Cognitive Neuroscience, Duke University, 125 Biological Sciences Drive, Durham NC 27708, USA. b.hare@duke.edu <b.hare@duke.edu>
Export Citation:
APA/MLA Format     Download EndNote     Download BibTex
MeSH Terms
Descriptor/Qualifier:
Animals
Behavior, Animal / physiology*
Food*
Pan paniscus / physiology*
Social Behavior*

From MEDLINE®/PubMed®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine


Previous Document:  Transcriptom-based identification of a putative role for the human Acyl-CoA-Binding-Protein (ACBP) i...
Next Document:  Morphogen Gradients: Limits to Signaling or Limits to Measurement?