Document Detail


Bone loss in anterior instability.
MedLine Citation:
PMID:  23297102     Owner:  NLM     Status:  PubMed-not-MEDLINE    
Abstract/OtherAbstract:
Bone loss is commonly observed in shoulders with anterior instability. The Latarjet procedure is commonly performed when a glenoid bony defect exists that is greater than 25 % of the glenoid width or when the risk of recurrent instability is higher (i.e., collision-sport athletes). Hill-Sachs lesions need to be assessed as well. For the purpose of assessing the bipolar lesions, the glenoid track concept is useful. A Hill-Sachs lesion that is located more medially than the medial margin of the glenoid track is defined as an engaging Hill-Sachs lesion. A potential treatment for such a condition is remplissage, but this procedure also decreases range of motion. Thus, its application in overhead athletes needs to be carefully considered.
Authors:
Eiji Itoi; Nobuyuki Yamamoto; Daisuke Kurokawa; Hirotaka Sano
Publication Detail:
Type:  Journal Article    
Journal Detail:
Title:  Current reviews in musculoskeletal medicine     Volume:  6     ISSN:  1935-973X     ISO Abbreviation:  Curr Rev Musculoskelet Med     Publication Date:  2013 Mar 
Date Detail:
Created Date:  2013-02-14     Completed Date:  2013-02-15     Revised Date:  2013-07-11    
Medline Journal Info:
Nlm Unique ID:  101317803     Medline TA:  Curr Rev Musculoskelet Med     Country:  United States    
Other Details:
Languages:  eng     Pagination:  88-94     Citation Subset:  -    
Affiliation:
Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, Tohoku University School of Medicine, 1-1 Seiryo-machi, Aoba-ku, Sendai, 980-8574, Japan, itoi-eiji@med.tohoku.ac.jp.
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