Document Detail


Bone Mineral Density as a Predictor of Atherosclerosis and Arterial Wall Stiffness in Obese African-American Women.
MedLine Citation:
PMID:  23381741     Owner:  NLM     Status:  Publisher    
Abstract/OtherAbstract:
Bone demineralization is associated with higher cardiovascular event rates, possibly due to vascular calcification and accelerated atherosclerosis. African-Americans have less bone loss and less calcium content within atherosclerotic plaques. However, whether loss of bone mass is related to atherosclerosis has not been examined in African-Americans. The objective of this study was to evaluate possible associations between bone mineral density (BMD), carotid intimal-medial thickness (CIMT), and arterial stiffness. We studied 100 obese African-American women (BMI: 26.6 ± 6.2; age: 63 ± 14 years) referred for BMD estimation by dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry scan. BMD (g/cm(2)) was obtained at the lumbar spine (L1-L4), femoral neck, and total hip. Arterial stiffness was evaluated by the heart rate-corrected augmentation index (AI@75) and pulse wave velocity (PWV) using applanation tonometry. CIMT was measured by vascular ultrasound. Mean CIMT, AI@75, and PWV were 0.72 ± 0.14 mm, 28.8 ± 9.0%, and 8.9 ± 1.6 m/s, respectively. Mean BMD values at the lumbar spine, femoral neck, and hip were 0.96 ± 0.19, 0.80 ± 0.16, and 0.91 ± 0.17 g/cm(2). Older subjects had higher CIMT (r = 0.61, p < 0.001) and AI@75 (r = 0.42, p < 0.001). There was a significant correlation between AI@75 and CIMT (r = 0.45, p < 0.001). BMD was negatively correlated with AI@75 (lumbar: r = -0.22, p = 0.03; femoral neck: r = -0.24, p = 0.01; hip: r = -0.21, p = 0.03). BMD was unrelated to CIMT (lumbar: r = -0.09, p = 0.42; femoral neck: r = -0.15, p = 0.17; hip: r = -0.13, p = 0.23). On multivariate analysis, age (p < 0.001), hypertension (p = 0.02), and lumbar BMD (p = 0.01, R(2) = 0.30) were independent predictors of increased AI@75 after adjusting for age, height, and cardiovascular risk factors. These findings were unchanged upon substitution of femoral neck BMD (p = 0.05, R(2) = 0.28) into the model. There was a trend with hip BMD (p = 0.06, R(2) = 0.28) in the regression model. Age-matched comparison between normal BMD (n = 25) and osteoporotic patients (n = 34) demonstrated a significant difference in AI@75 (26.6 ± 8.9 vs. 31.6 ± 9.1%, p = 0.04). In summary, women with lower BMD had increased arterial stiffness. There was no relationship between BMD and atherosclerosis. In conclusion, age, hypertension, and BMD are independent predictors of higher arterial stiffness. Vascular changes are related to bone mineral loss, suggesting lower BMD may increase cardiovascular risk in African-Americans.
Authors:
Samy I McFarlane; Ghazanfar Qureshi; Gagandeep Singh; Kinda Venner-Jones; Louis Salciccioli; Jason Lazar
Publication Detail:
Type:  JOURNAL ARTICLE     Date:  2012-11-24
Journal Detail:
Title:  Cardiorenal medicine     Volume:  2     ISSN:  1664-3828     ISO Abbreviation:  Cardiorenal Med     Publication Date:  2012 Dec 
Date Detail:
Created Date:  2013-2-5     Completed Date:  -     Revised Date:  -    
Medline Journal Info:
Nlm Unique ID:  101554863     Medline TA:  Cardiorenal Med     Country:  -    
Other Details:
Languages:  ENG     Pagination:  328-334     Citation Subset:  -    
Affiliation:
Division of Cardiology, State University of New York Downstate Medical Center, Brooklyn, N.Y., USA.
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