Document Detail


Bipolar disorder, testosterone administration, and homicide: a case report.
MedLine Citation:
PMID:  24527885     Owner:  NLM     Status:  Publisher    
Abstract/OtherAbstract:
Abstract Objective. Homicide is a major public health and social concern in the United States. Studies have found higher rates of psychiatric disorders in homicide offenders than in the general population. The aim of this article is to report and to discuss a case of a patient with bipolar disorder and hypogonadism who murdered his wife shortly after a testosterone injection. Methods. A case study and a review of the relevant literature. Results. Our case study as well as several case reports in the literature suggests that testosterone administration or high testosterone levels may be associated with homicidal behavior. Conclusion. Further studies of the role of testosterone in the neurobiology of violent and homicidal behavior may lead to improvements in the prevention of homicides.
Authors:
Leo Sher; Sean Landers
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Publication Detail:
Type:  JOURNAL ARTICLE     Date:  2014-2-17
Journal Detail:
Title:  International journal of psychiatry in clinical practice     Volume:  -     ISSN:  1471-1788     ISO Abbreviation:  Int J Psychiatry Clin Pract     Publication Date:  2014 Feb 
Date Detail:
Created Date:  2014-2-17     Completed Date:  -     Revised Date:  -    
Medline Journal Info:
Nlm Unique ID:  9709509     Medline TA:  Int J Psychiatry Clin Pract     Country:  -    
Other Details:
Languages:  ENG     Pagination:  -     Citation Subset:  -    
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