Document Detail


Biomechanical properties of human tibias in long-term spinal cord injury.
MedLine Citation:
PMID:  9239622     Owner:  NLM     Status:  MEDLINE    
Abstract/OtherAbstract:
Long-term spinal cord injury (SCI) profoundly alters skeletal structure and function. In this study, the biomechanical properties of tibias from persons with SCI and from individuals closely matched in age and size but without SCI were quantified at both the structural and material levels. Nondestructive torsion tests were performed to determine apparent shear moduli for the tibia. The cortical thicknesses and polar moment of inertia were determined numerically. Four-point bending tests were performed to determine flexural modulus of elasticity on cortical bone specimens of the tibia. The apparent shear moduli of the SCI tibias were found to be lower than the non-SCI tibias (p < 0.05). The cortical thicknesses of the SCI tibias were significantly thinner than the control tibias (p < 0.05), while the polar moment of inertia showed no significant differences between control and SCI tibial cross sections (p > 0.05). The flexural modulus of elasticity of the cortical bone specimens were lower in the SCI tibias than the controls (p < 0.05). These differences suggest that tibias may undergo micro-structural changes as well as structural adaptation following SCI, which alter their mechanical properties.
Authors:
T Q Lee; T A Shapiro; D M Bell
Publication Detail:
Type:  Journal Article; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't; Research Support, U.S. Gov't, Non-P.H.S.    
Journal Detail:
Title:  Journal of rehabilitation research and development     Volume:  34     ISSN:  0748-7711     ISO Abbreviation:  J Rehabil Res Dev     Publication Date:  1997 Jul 
Date Detail:
Created Date:  1997-09-11     Completed Date:  1997-09-11     Revised Date:  2007-11-15    
Medline Journal Info:
Nlm Unique ID:  8410047     Medline TA:  J Rehabil Res Dev     Country:  UNITED STATES    
Other Details:
Languages:  eng     Pagination:  295-302     Citation Subset:  IM    
Affiliation:
Department of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation, Long Beach VA Medical Center, CA 90822, USA. tqlee@pop.long-beach.va.gov
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MeSH Terms
Descriptor/Qualifier:
Aged
Amputation
Biomechanics
Case-Control Studies
Fractures, Spontaneous / etiology
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Osteoporosis / etiology*,  pathology*,  physiopathology
Rotation
Spinal Cord Injuries / complications*
Tibia / pathology*,  physiopathology
Torsion Abnormality

From MEDLINE®/PubMed®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine


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