Document Detail


Bioavailability of food folates and evaluation of food matrix effects with a rat bioassay.
MedLine Citation:
PMID:  2007897     Owner:  NLM     Status:  MEDLINE    
Abstract/OtherAbstract:
Folate bioavailability of beef liver, lima beans, peas, spinach, mushrooms, collards, orange juice and wheat germ was estimated with a protocol of folate depletion-repletion using growth and liver, serum and erythrocyte folate of weanling male rats. Diets with 125, 250 and 375 micrograms folic acid/kg were standards. Individual foods were incorporated into a folate-free amino acid-based diet alone (250 micrograms folate/kg diet from food) or mixed with folic acid (125 micrograms folate from food + 125 micrograms folic acid) to evaluate folate bioavailability and effects of food matrix. Beef liver and orange juice folates were as available as folic acid, whereas those of wheat germ were less bioavailable. Folates of peas and spinach were also less available than folic acid using liver and serum folate concentrations and total liver folate as response criteria, but they were not lower when based on growth and erythrocyte folate concentrations. Lima bean, mushroom and collard folates were as available as folic acid using four of five response criteria. Folate bioavailability of all foods generally exceeded 70%. All response criteria gave approximately equivalent results, indicating that growth and tissue folate levels are appropriate criteria. No food matrix effects were observed for any food except lima beans. Foods rich in polyglutamyl folates were less bioavailable than those of foods rich in short-chain folates.
Authors:
A J Clifford; M K Heid; J M Peerson; N D Bills
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Publication Detail:
Type:  Journal Article; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't; Research Support, U.S. Gov't, Non-P.H.S.; Research Support, U.S. Gov't, P.H.S.    
Journal Detail:
Title:  The Journal of nutrition     Volume:  121     ISSN:  0022-3166     ISO Abbreviation:  J. Nutr.     Publication Date:  1991 Apr 
Date Detail:
Created Date:  1991-04-30     Completed Date:  1991-04-30     Revised Date:  2007-11-14    
Medline Journal Info:
Nlm Unique ID:  0404243     Medline TA:  J Nutr     Country:  UNITED STATES    
Other Details:
Languages:  eng     Pagination:  445-53     Citation Subset:  IM    
Affiliation:
Department of Nutrition, University of California, Davis 95616.
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MeSH Terms
Descriptor/Qualifier:
Animals
Biological Assay
Erythrocytes / metabolism
Folic Acid / administration & dosage*,  analogs & derivatives*,  pharmacokinetics,  pharmacology
Food*
Liver / metabolism
Male
Mathematics
Nutritive Value
Rats
Rats, Inbred Strains
Weight Gain
Grant Support
ID/Acronym/Agency:
AM-16726/AM/NIADDK NIH HHS; DK-38637/DK/NIDDK NIH HHS
Chemical
Reg. No./Substance:
59-30-3/Folic Acid

From MEDLINE®/PubMed®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine


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