Document Detail


Beliefs about eating and eating disorders.
MedLine Citation:
PMID:  19665098     Owner:  NLM     Status:  MEDLINE    
Abstract/OtherAbstract:
Beliefs about foods and binge eating may influence the development and maintenance of eating disorders and the likelihood that people will seek treatment. We found that the majority of a random sample of members of a large health maintenance organization considered binge eating a problem for which there are effective treatments. Self-reported binge eaters, however, were significantly less likely to agree that there are effective treatments. Two thirds of the sample reported that certain foods are addictive and also believed that strict dieting is an effective means of reducing binge eating. Therapeutic implications of these attitudes are discussed.
Authors:
G Terence Wilson; Nancy A Perrin; Francine Rosselli; Ruth H Striegel-Moore; Lynn L Debar; Helena C Kraemer
Related Documents :
10093278 - Communication about health and the risk effect of eating traditional food.
19956358 - Alimentary epigenetics: a developmental psychobiological systems view of the perception...
17975508 - The influence of olfactory loss on dietary behaviors.
12880618 - Ambiguity of 'snack' in british usage.
9430498 - Ige/anti-ige immune complexes in sera from patients with crohn's disease do not contain...
18334278 - In silico assessment of toxicity of heat-generated food contaminants.
Publication Detail:
Type:  Journal Article; Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural     Date:  2009-04-05
Journal Detail:
Title:  Eating behaviors     Volume:  10     ISSN:  1873-7358     ISO Abbreviation:  Eat Behav     Publication Date:  2009 Aug 
Date Detail:
Created Date:  2009-08-11     Completed Date:  2009-10-28     Revised Date:  2013-07-09    
Medline Journal Info:
Nlm Unique ID:  101090048     Medline TA:  Eat Behav     Country:  United States    
Other Details:
Languages:  eng     Pagination:  157-60     Citation Subset:  IM    
Affiliation:
Graduate School of Applied and Professional Psychology, Rutgers, The State University of New Jersey, Piscataway, NJ 08854-8020, United States. tewilson@rci.rutgers.edu
Export Citation:
APA/MLA Format     Download EndNote     Download BibTex
MeSH Terms
Descriptor/Qualifier:
Adolescent
Adult
Behavior, Addictive / psychology,  therapy
Bulimia / psychology*,  therapy
Culture*
Diet, Reducing / psychology
Eating*
Female
Health Maintenance Organizations
Health Surveys
Humans
Male
Northwestern United States
Young Adult
Grant Support
ID/Acronym/Agency:
MH066966/MH/NIMH NIH HHS; R01 MH066966/MH/NIMH NIH HHS

From MEDLINE®/PubMed®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine


Previous Document:  Ambiguity and judgments of obese individuals: no news could be bad news.
Next Document:  Correlates of video game screen time among males: body mass, physical activity, and other media use.