Document Detail


Before-birth climatologic data may play a role in the development of allergies in infants.
MedLine Citation:
PMID:  17346293     Owner:  NLM     Status:  MEDLINE    
Abstract/OtherAbstract:
While an exacerbation in allergic symptoms corresponding to seasons has long been reported, few studies have investigated the association between the season of birth and allergic disorders. The aim of this study was to investigate whether the climatologic data before and after birth affected the incidence of atopic dermatitis (AD) and the results of allergy-related blood tests in early infancy. From February 1995 to January 2000, 2136 infants were tested for AD and followed for 12 months. AD patients were tested by using allergy-related blood tests. Data were compared according to the month of birth and the climatologic data using a computed statistical software package. Six hundred and thirty infants had AD before 12 months old, and significant differences were found according to the season of birth (p < 0.0001). Infants born in spring showed the lowest (22.3%) incidence, while those born in autumn showed the highest (34.6%). In 369 patients, total serum IgE levels, and serum specific IgE levels with egg white at 3 months old were also different according to the season of birth. All of these levels were lower in patients born in spring and summer, and higher in patients born in autumn and winter. Furthermore, the cumulative sunshine amount during the 3 months before and after birth was inversely correlated, while the average temperature over the 3 months before birth was positively correlated to the incidence of AD according to the month of birth. The climatologic data around birth may play an important role in whether an infant develops allergies.
Authors:
Kazuyo Kuzume; Masahito Kusu
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Publication Detail:
Type:  Journal Article     Date:  2007-03-07
Journal Detail:
Title:  Pediatric allergy and immunology : official publication of the European Society of Pediatric Allergy and Immunology     Volume:  18     ISSN:  0905-6157     ISO Abbreviation:  Pediatr Allergy Immunol     Publication Date:  2007 Jun 
Date Detail:
Created Date:  2007-06-22     Completed Date:  2007-10-09     Revised Date:  2008-05-28    
Medline Journal Info:
Nlm Unique ID:  9106718     Medline TA:  Pediatr Allergy Immunol     Country:  England    
Other Details:
Languages:  eng     Pagination:  281-7     Citation Subset:  IM    
Affiliation:
Department of Pediatrics, Ehime University School of Medicine, Toon, Japan. kuzumeka@m.ehime-u.ac.jp
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MeSH Terms
Descriptor/Qualifier:
Climate*
Female
Humans
Hypersensitivity / epidemiology*
Immunoglobulin E / blood
Infant
Infant, Newborn
Japan
Male
Pregnancy
Prenatal Exposure Delayed Effects / immunology*
Radioallergosorbent Test
Seasons*
Temperature
Weather*
Chemical
Reg. No./Substance:
37341-29-0/Immunoglobulin E

From MEDLINE®/PubMed®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine


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