Document Detail


Avian predation pressure as a potential driver of periodical cicada cycle length.
MedLine Citation:
PMID:  23234852     Owner:  NLM     Status:  In-Data-Review    
Abstract/OtherAbstract:
Abstract The extraordinarily long life cycles, synchronous emergences at 13- or 17-year intervals, and complex geographic distribution of periodical cicadas (Magicicada spp.) in eastern North America are a long-standing evolutionary enigma. Although a variety of factors, including satiation of aboveground predators and avoidance of interbrood hybridization, have been hypothesized to shape the evolution of this system, no empirical support for these mechanisms has previously been reported, beyond the observation that bird predation can extirpate small, experimentally mistimed emergences. Here we show that periodical cicada emergences appear to set populations of potential avian predators on numerical trajectories that result in significantly lower potential predation pressure during the subsequent emergence. This result provides new support for the importance of predators in shaping periodical cicada life history, offers an ecological rationale for why emergences are synchronized at the observed multiyear intervals, and may explain some of the developmental plasticity observed in these unique insects.
Authors:
Walter D Koenig; Andrew M Liebhold
Publication Detail:
Type:  Journal Article     Date:  2012-11-27
Journal Detail:
Title:  The American naturalist     Volume:  181     ISSN:  1537-5323     ISO Abbreviation:  Am. Nat.     Publication Date:  2013 Jan 
Date Detail:
Created Date:  2012-12-13     Completed Date:  -     Revised Date:  -    
Medline Journal Info:
Nlm Unique ID:  2984688R     Medline TA:  Am Nat     Country:  United States    
Other Details:
Languages:  eng     Pagination:  145-9     Citation Subset:  IM    
Affiliation:
Cornell Lab of Ornithology, Ithaca, New York 14850; and Department of Neurobiology and Behavior, Cornell University, Ithaca, New York 14853.
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