Document Detail


Autonomic recovery after exercise in trained athletes: intensity and duration effects.
MedLine Citation:
PMID:  17762370     Owner:  NLM     Status:  MEDLINE    
Abstract/OtherAbstract:
PURPOSE: To investigate the effects of training intensity and duration, through a range representative of training in endurance athletes, on acute recovery of autonomic nervous system (ANS) balance after exercise. METHODS: Nine highly trained (HT) male runners (VO2max 72 +/- 5 mL.kg.min(-1), 14 +/- 3 training hours per week) and eight trained (T) male subjects (VO2max 60 +/- 5 mL.kg.min(-1), 7 +/- 1 training hours per week) completed preliminary testing to determine ventilatory thresholds (VT1, VT2) and VO2max. HT performed four intensity-controlled training sessions: 60 min and 120 min below VT1; 60 min with 30 min between VT1 and VT2 (threshold); and 60 min above VT2 (6 x 3 min at 96% VO2max, 2 min of recovery). T also completed the interval session to compare ANS recovery between HT and T. Supine heart rate variability (HRV) was quantified at regular intervals through 4 h of recovery. RESULTS: When HT ran 60 or 120 min below VT1, HRV returned to pretraining values within 5-10 min. However, training at threshold (2.7 +/- 0.4 mM) or above VT2 (7.1 +/- 0.7 mM) induced a significant, but essentially identical, delay of HRV recovery (return to baseline by approximately 30 min). In T, HRV recovery was significantly slower, with HRV returning to baseline by >or=90 min after the same interval session. CONCLUSIONS: In the highly trained endurance athlete, exercise for <or=120 min below the first ventilatory threshold causes minimal disturbance in ANS balance. ANS recovery is more rapid in highly trained than in trained subjects after high-intensity exercise. Further, the first ventilatory threshold may demarcate a "binary" threshold for ANS/HRV recovery in highly trained athletes, because further delays in HRV recovery with even higher training intensities were not observed.
Authors:
Stephen Seiler; Olav Haugen; Erin Kuffel
Publication Detail:
Type:  Journal Article    
Journal Detail:
Title:  Medicine and science in sports and exercise     Volume:  39     ISSN:  0195-9131     ISO Abbreviation:  Med Sci Sports Exerc     Publication Date:  2007 Aug 
Date Detail:
Created Date:  2007-08-31     Completed Date:  2007-10-30     Revised Date:  2008-11-21    
Medline Journal Info:
Nlm Unique ID:  8005433     Medline TA:  Med Sci Sports Exerc     Country:  United States    
Other Details:
Languages:  eng     Pagination:  1366-73     Citation Subset:  IM; S    
Affiliation:
Faculty of Health and Sport, Agder University College, Kristiansand, Norway. stephen.seiler@hia.no
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MeSH Terms
Descriptor/Qualifier:
Adolescent
Adult
Autonomic Nervous System / physiology*
Exercise*
Heart Rate
Humans
Male
Norway
Physical Endurance / physiology*
Physical Exertion / physiology*
Physical Fitness
Recovery of Function / physiology*

From MEDLINE®/PubMed®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine


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