Document Detail


Attitudes of pregnant women towards participation in perinatal epidemiological research.
MedLine Citation:
PMID:  19689493     Owner:  NLM     Status:  MEDLINE    
Abstract/OtherAbstract:
We assessed attitudes of a multi-ethnic sample of pregnant women in regard to participation in five data collection procedures planned for use in the National Children's Study. A cross-sectional survey was conducted in nine prenatal clinics in Kent County, Michigan between April and October 2006. Women were approached in clinic waiting rooms at the time of their first prenatal visit and 311 (91.0%) participated. Women were asked about their willingness to participate, and the smallest amount of compensation required for participation in a 45-min in-person interview, a 15-min telephone interview, maternal and infant medical record abstraction, and an infant physical examination. Percentages for willingness to participate were highest for telephone interview (83%), followed by in-person interview (60%), infant examination (57%), and maternal (56%) and infant medical records (54%). About 34-48% of women reported that no compensation would be required for participation by data procedure. Some women reported unwillingness to participate in telephone (9%) or personal (17%) interview, record abstraction (34%) or infant examination (26%), even with compensation. Education greater than high school was associated with increased odds of refusal for infant physical examination, adjusted odds ratio 2.44 [95% confidence interval 1.41, 4.23]. In conclusion, 9-34% of pregnant women, depending on procedure, stated they would not participate in non-invasive research procedures such as medical record abstraction and infant examination, even with compensation. Resistance to these research procedures was especially noted among more highly educated women. Planning for the National Children's Study will have to address potential resistance to research among pregnant women.
Authors:
Sarah Nechuta; Lanay M Mudd; Lynette Biery; Michael R Elliott; James M Lepkowski; Nigel Paneth;
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Publication Detail:
Type:  Journal Article; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't    
Journal Detail:
Title:  Paediatric and perinatal epidemiology     Volume:  23     ISSN:  1365-3016     ISO Abbreviation:  Paediatr Perinat Epidemiol     Publication Date:  2009 Sep 
Date Detail:
Created Date:  2009-08-19     Completed Date:  2010-01-22     Revised Date:  -    
Medline Journal Info:
Nlm Unique ID:  8709766     Medline TA:  Paediatr Perinat Epidemiol     Country:  England    
Other Details:
Languages:  eng     Pagination:  424-30     Citation Subset:  IM    
Affiliation:
Department of Epidemiology, College of Human Medicine, Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI 48824, USA. snechuta@epi.msu.edu
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MeSH Terms
Descriptor/Qualifier:
Adult
Attitude to Health / ethnology
Biomedical Research
Cross-Sectional Studies
Data Collection*
Female
Humans
Maternal Health Services
Michigan
Pilot Projects
Pregnant Women / psychology*
Prenatal Care
Investigator
Investigator/Affiliation:
Jan Bokemeier / ; Naomi Breslau / ; H Dele Davies / ; Nigel Paneth / ; Valerie Castle / ; Michael Elliott / ; Timothy Johnson / ; Daniel Keating / ; James Lepkowski / ; Charles Barone / ; Christine Johnson / ; Christine Joseph / ; Virginia Delaney-Black / ; William Lyman / ; Hilary Ratner / ; Robert Sokol / ; Bonita Stanton / ; Daniel Waltz / ; Lori Cameron / ; Violanda Grigorescu / ; Doug Paterson / ; Frederick Keeslar / ; R Michael Knight / ; Robert Pestronk / ; Kevin Lokar / ; Kathy Urbats / ; Anahid Kulwicki /

From MEDLINE®/PubMed®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine


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