Document Detail


Attentional enhancement of spatial resolution: linking behavioural and neurophysiological evidence.
MedLine Citation:
PMID:  23422910     Owner:  NLM     Status:  MEDLINE    
Abstract/OtherAbstract:
Attention allows us to select relevant sensory information for preferential processing. Behaviourally, it improves performance in various visual tasks. One prominent effect of attention is the modulation of performance in tasks that involve the visual system's spatial resolution. Physiologically, attention modulates neuronal responses and alters the profile and position of receptive fields near the attended location. Here, we develop a hypothesis linking the behavioural and electrophysiological evidence. The proposed framework seeks to explain how these receptive field changes enhance the visual system's effective spatial resolution and how the same mechanisms may also underlie attentional effects on the representation of spatial information.
Authors:
Katharina Anton-Erxleben; Marisa Carrasco
Publication Detail:
Type:  Journal Article; Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't; Review    
Journal Detail:
Title:  Nature reviews. Neuroscience     Volume:  14     ISSN:  1471-0048     ISO Abbreviation:  Nat. Rev. Neurosci.     Publication Date:  2013 Mar 
Date Detail:
Created Date:  2013-02-20     Completed Date:  2013-04-11     Revised Date:  2014-04-10    
Medline Journal Info:
Nlm Unique ID:  100962781     Medline TA:  Nat Rev Neurosci     Country:  England    
Other Details:
Languages:  eng     Pagination:  188-200     Citation Subset:  IM    
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MeSH Terms
Descriptor/Qualifier:
Animals
Attention / physiology*
Brain / physiology*
Humans
Orientation / physiology
Space Perception / physiology*
Grant Support
ID/Acronym/Agency:
1F32EY021420/EY/NEI NIH HHS; R01 EY016200/EY/NEI NIH HHS; R01 EY019693/EY/NEI NIH HHS; R01-EY016200/EY/NEI NIH HHS; R01-EY019693/EY/NEI NIH HHS
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