Document Detail


Associations of socioeconomic status and processed food intake with serum phosphorus concentration in community-living adults: the Multi-Ethnic Study of Atherosclerosis (MESA).
MedLine Citation:
PMID:  22217539     Owner:  NLM     Status:  MEDLINE    
Abstract/OtherAbstract:
OBJECTIVE: Higher serum phosphorus concentrations are associated with cardiovascular disease events and mortality. Low socioeconomic status is linked with higher serum phosphorus concentration, but the reasons are unclear. Poor individuals disproportionately consume inexpensive processed foods commonly enriched with phosphorus-based food preservatives. Accordingly, we hypothesized that excess intake of these foods accounts for a relationship between lower socioeconomic status and higher serum phosphorus concentration.
DESIGN: Cross-sectional analysis.
SETTING AND PARTICIPANTS: We examined a random cohort of 2,664 participants with available phosphorus measurements in the Multi-Ethnic Study of Atherosclerosis, a community-based sample of individuals free of clinically apparent cardiovascular disease from across the United States.
PREDICTOR VARIABLES: Socioeconomic status, the intake of foods commonly enriched with phosphorus-based food additives (processed meats, sodas), and frequency of fast-food consumption.
OUTCOMES: Fasting morning serum phosphorus concentrations.
RESULTS: In unadjusted analyses, lower income and lower educational achievement categories were associated with modestly higher serum phosphorus concentration (by 0.02 to 0.10 mg/dL, P < .05 for all). These associations were attenuated in models adjusted for demographic and clinical factors, almost entirely due to adjustment for female gender. In multivariable-adjusted analyses, there were no statistically significant associations of processed meat intake or frequency of fast-food consumption with serum phosphorus. In contrast, each serving per day higher soda intake was associated with 0.02 mg/dL lower serum phosphorus concentration (95% confidence interval, -0.04, -0.01).
CONCLUSIONS: Greater intake of foods commonly enriched with phosphorus additives was not associated with higher serum phosphorus concentration in a community-living sample with largely preserved kidney function. These results suggest that excess intake of processed and fast foods may not impact fasting serum phosphorus concentrations among individuals without kidney disease.
Authors:
Orlando M Gutiérrez; Ronit Katz; Carmen A Peralta; Ian H de Boer; David Siscovick; Myles Wolf; Ana Diez Roux; Bryan Kestenbaum; Jennifer A Nettleton; Joachim H Ix
Related Documents :
18532109 - Detection of beaked whales using near surface towed hydrophones: prospects for survey a...
18262299 - Anti-listerial activity of a polymeric film coated with hybrid coatings doped with ente...
15083739 - Real-time nucleic acid-based detection methods for pathogenic bacteria in food.
16376449 - Lactobacillus plantarum inhibits growth of listeria monocytogenes in an in vitro contin...
19350979 - Reduction of listeria on ready-to-eat sausages after exposure to a combination of pulse...
17900099 - A review of the incidence and transmission of listeria monocytogenes in ready-to-eat pr...
7079329 - Feeding pattern in peromyscus maniculatus: the response to periodic food deprivation.
18942549 - Potential animal feed allergens.
6412969 - The bacterial flora of candling-reject and dead-in-shell turkey eggs.
Publication Detail:
Type:  Journal Article; Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural     Date:  2012-01-03
Journal Detail:
Title:  Journal of renal nutrition : the official journal of the Council on Renal Nutrition of the National Kidney Foundation     Volume:  22     ISSN:  1532-8503     ISO Abbreviation:  J Ren Nutr     Publication Date:  2012 Sep 
Date Detail:
Created Date:  2012-08-27     Completed Date:  2013-01-11     Revised Date:  2014-09-21    
Medline Journal Info:
Nlm Unique ID:  9112938     Medline TA:  J Ren Nutr     Country:  United States    
Other Details:
Languages:  eng     Pagination:  480-9     Citation Subset:  IM    
Copyright Information:
Copyright © 2012 National Kidney Foundation, Inc. All rights reserved.
Export Citation:
APA/MLA Format     Download EndNote     Download BibTex
MeSH Terms
Descriptor/Qualifier:
Aged
Atherosclerosis / blood*,  epidemiology*,  ethnology
Cohort Studies
Cross-Sectional Studies
Diet / adverse effects*,  ethnology
Educational Status
Female
Food Handling
Food Preservatives / administration & dosage,  adverse effects*
Humans
Income
Male
Meat
Middle Aged
Phosphorus / administration & dosage,  blood*
Questionnaires
Social Class*
United States / epidemiology
Grant Support
ID/Acronym/Agency:
K23 DK081673/DK/NIDDK NIH HHS; K23 DK081673-05/DK/NIDDK NIH HHS; K23 DK082793/DK/NIDDK NIH HHS; K23DK081673/DK/NIDDK NIH HHS; N01 HC095159/HC/NHLBI NIH HHS; N01 HC095169/HC/NHLBI NIH HHS; N01-HC-95169/HC/NHLBI NIH HHS; N01-HC95159/HC/NHLBI NIH HHS; N01-HC95160/HC/NHLBI NIH HHS; N01-HC95161/HC/NHLBI NIH HHS; N01-HC95162/HC/NHLBI NIH HHS; N01-HC95163/HC/NHLBI NIH HHS; N01-HC95164/HC/NHLBI NIH HHS; N01-HC95165/HC/NHLBI NIH HHS; R21 HL091217/HL/NHLBI NIH HHS; R21 HL091217-01A2S1/HL/NHLBI NIH HHS; R21 HL091217-02/HL/NHLBI NIH HHS; R21HL091217/HL/NHLBI NIH HHS; R21HL091217-01A2S1/HL/NHLBI NIH HHS
Chemical
Reg. No./Substance:
0/Food Preservatives; 27YLU75U4W/Phosphorus
Comments/Corrections

From MEDLINE®/PubMed®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine


Previous Document:  Have Renal Dietitians Successfully Implemented Evidence-Based Guidelines Into Practice? A Survey of ...
Next Document:  The interaction of PKN3 with RhoC promotes malignant growth.