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Association of height and pubertal timing with lipoprotein subclass profile: Exploring the role of genetic and environmental effects.
MedLine Citation:
PMID:  23649903     Owner:  NLM     Status:  Publisher    
Abstract/OtherAbstract:
OBJECTIVES: Little is known about the relationship between growth and lipoprotein profile. We aimed to analyze common genetic and environmental factors in the association of height from late childhood to adulthood and pubertal timing with serum lipid and lipoprotein subclass profile. METHODS: A longitudinal cohort of Finnish twin pairs (FinnTwin12) was analyzed using self-reported height at 11-12, 14, 17 years and measured stature at adult age (21-24 years). Data were available for 719 individual twins including 298 complete pairs. Serum lipids and lipoprotein subclasses were measured by proton nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy. Multivariate variance component models for twin data were fitted. Cholesky decomposition was used to partition the phenotypic covariation among traits into additive genetic and unique environmental correlations. RESULTS: In men, the strongest associations for both adult height and puberty were observed with total cholesterol, low-density lipoprotein cholesterol, intermediate-density lipoprotein cholesterol, and low-density lipoprotein particle subclasses (max. r = -0.19). In women, the magnitude of the correlations was weaker (max. r = -0.13). Few associations were detected between height during adolescence and adult lipid profile. Early onset of puberty was related to an adverse lipid profile, but delayed pubertal development in girls was associated with an unfavorable profile, as well. All associations were mediated mainly by additive genetic factors, but unique environmental effects cannot be disregarded. CONCLUSIONS: Early puberty and shorter adult height relate to higher concentrations of atherogenic lipids and lipoprotein particles in early adulthood. Common genetic effects behind these phenotypes substantially contribute to the observed associations. Am. J. Hum. Biol., 2013. © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.
Authors:
Aline Jelenkovic; Leonie H Bogl; Richard J Rose; Antti J Kangas; Pasi Soininen; Mika Ala-Korpela; Jaakko Kaprio; Karri Silventoinen
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Publication Detail:
Type:  JOURNAL ARTICLE     Date:  2013-5-4
Journal Detail:
Title:  American journal of human biology : the official journal of the Human Biology Council     Volume:  -     ISSN:  1520-6300     ISO Abbreviation:  Am. J. Hum. Biol.     Publication Date:  2013 May 
Date Detail:
Created Date:  2013-5-7     Completed Date:  -     Revised Date:  -    
Medline Journal Info:
Nlm Unique ID:  8915029     Medline TA:  Am J Hum Biol     Country:  -    
Other Details:
Languages:  ENG     Pagination:  1-8     Citation Subset:  -    
Copyright Information:
Copyright © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.
Affiliation:
Department of Genetics, Physical Anthropology and Animal Physiology, University of the Basque Country UPV/EHU, Leioa, Spain; IKERBASQUE, Basque Foundation for Science, Bilbao, Spain; Department of Public Health, Hjelt Institute, University of Helsinki, Helsinki, Finland.
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