Document Detail


Assessment of food, nutrition, and physical activity practices in oklahoma child-care centers.
MedLine Citation:
PMID:  22818731     Owner:  NLM     Status:  In-Data-Review    
Abstract/OtherAbstract:
The purpose of the current study was to determine the obesogenic practices in all-day child-care centers caring for preschool-aged children. This study used a cross-sectional, self-reported survey mailed to centers across Oklahoma (n=314). Frequency of responses and χ(2) were calculated comparing region and star rating. Items where the majority of centers frequently report best practices include: daily fruits served (76%), daily nonfried vegetables served (71%), rarely/never served sugary drinks (92%), rarely/never used food to encourage good behaviors (88%), staff join children at table most of the time (81%), staff rarely eat different foods in view of children (69%), visible self-serve or request availability of water (93%), regular informal communication about healthy eating (86%), opportunities for outdoor play (95%), not withholding activity for punishment (91%), accessible play equipment (59% to 80% for different types of equipment), and minimization of extended sitting time (78%). Practices where centers can improve include increasing variety of vegetables (18%), reducing frequency of high-fat meats served (74% serve more than once per week), increasing high-fiber and whole-grain foods (35% offer daily), serving style of "seconds" (28% help kids determine whether they are still hungry), nonfood holiday celebrations (44% use nonfood treats), having toys and books that encourage healthy eating (27%) and physical activity (25%) in all rooms in the center, a standard nutrition (21%) and physical education (50%) curriculum, and following a written physical activity policy (43%). Practitioners can use these data to develop benchmarks and interventions, as this was the first study to assess statewide obesogenic practices in child care.
Authors:
Susan B Sisson; Janis E Campbell; Kellie B May; Danielle R Brittain; Lisa A Monroe; Shannon H Guss; Jennifer L Ladner
Publication Detail:
Type:  Journal Article    
Journal Detail:
Title:  Journal of the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics     Volume:  112     ISSN:  2212-2672     ISO Abbreviation:  J Acad Nutr Diet     Publication Date:  2012 Aug 
Date Detail:
Created Date:  2012-07-23     Completed Date:  -     Revised Date:  -    
Medline Journal Info:
Nlm Unique ID:  101573920     Medline TA:  J Acad Nutr Diet     Country:  United States    
Other Details:
Languages:  eng     Pagination:  1230-40     Citation Subset:  AIM; IM    
Copyright Information:
Copyright © 2012 Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.
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