Document Detail


Arteriovenous malformation at pancreatobiliary region causing hemobilia after cholecystectomy.
MedLine Citation:
PMID:  8224662     Owner:  NLM     Status:  MEDLINE    
Abstract/OtherAbstract:
Pancreatic arteriovenous malformation is a rare condition that may cause gastrointestinal bleeding. A 66-year-old man with large arteriovenous malformation at the pancreatobiliary region is described. The patient had recurrent episodes of hemobilia after cholecystectomy performed for the treatment of cholelithiasis. Enlargement of the arteriovenous malformation was documented by angiography performed before and after the cholecystectomy. Bleeding from the biliary tract was successfully controlled by transarterial embolization. Cholecystectomy may have caused a hemodynamic change at the pancreatobiliary region, leading to the enlargement of the lesion and hemobilia.
Authors:
M Ishikawa; M Tanaka; Y Ogawa; K Chijiiwa
Publication Detail:
Type:  Case Reports; Journal Article; Review    
Journal Detail:
Title:  Gastroenterology     Volume:  105     ISSN:  0016-5085     ISO Abbreviation:  Gastroenterology     Publication Date:  1993 Nov 
Date Detail:
Created Date:  1993-12-01     Completed Date:  1993-12-01     Revised Date:  2005-11-16    
Medline Journal Info:
Nlm Unique ID:  0374630     Medline TA:  Gastroenterology     Country:  UNITED STATES    
Other Details:
Languages:  eng     Pagination:  1553-6     Citation Subset:  AIM; IM    
Affiliation:
Department of Surgergy I, Kyushu University Faculty of Medicine, Fukuoka, Japan.
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MeSH Terms
Descriptor/Qualifier:
Aged
Arteriovenous Malformations / complications*
Biliary Tract / blood supply*
Cholecystectomy / adverse effects*
Hemobilia / etiology*
Humans
Male
Pancreas / blood supply*

From MEDLINE®/PubMed®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine


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