Document Detail


Applicability of a new gastric tonometric probe in infants requiring intensive care.
MedLine Citation:
PMID:  18758429     Owner:  NLM     Status:  MEDLINE    
Abstract/OtherAbstract:
BACKGROUND: Gastric tonometry was developed for measuring the partial pressure of carbon dioxide in the gastrointestinal tract and particularly for monitoring the clinical condition of patients in critical states. The ballooned catheter used in this technique has proved to be a reliable tool in adult patients, but its use in pediatrics is limited because of technical difficulties. The aims of this paper are to describe the technique of application of a recently developed gastric tonometric probe especially suitable for performing measurements on neonates and infants and to present the first human results. MATERIAL/METHODS: Thirty-two neonates and infants requiring intensive care were monitored (age: 2-456 days, weight: 1200-6700 g), of whom 10 died. The pediatric index of mortality, acid-base parameters, PCO2 gap values, and intramucosal pH and pH gap values were measured or calculated. The new gastric tonometric probe, made of silicone rubber tubes, is balloon free. It is introduced into the stomach orally or nasopharyngeally through the use of a guide wire. After equilibration, the PCO2 level of the air inside the probe is measured with a capnograph. RESULTS: Application of the new probe proved simple. The pediatric index of mortality scores (35.1%+/-19.6% vs. 14.6%+/-14.8%), PCO2 gap values (13.48+/-9.30 mmHg vs. 8.43+/-6.54 mmHg), and the systemic-intramucosal pH differences (0.124+/-0.074 vs. 0.079+/-0.054) were significantly higher in the non-surviving patients. CONCLUSIONS: The new probe is well applicable for measurements of gastric PCO2 levels in infants.
Authors:
Gyula Tálosi; Domokos Boda
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Publication Detail:
Type:  Journal Article; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't    
Journal Detail:
Title:  Medical science monitor : international medical journal of experimental and clinical research     Volume:  14     ISSN:  1643-3750     ISO Abbreviation:  Med. Sci. Monit.     Publication Date:  2008 Sep 
Date Detail:
Created Date:  2008-09-01     Completed Date:  2008-11-04     Revised Date:  -    
Medline Journal Info:
Nlm Unique ID:  9609063     Medline TA:  Med Sci Monit     Country:  Poland    
Other Details:
Languages:  eng     Pagination:  PI32-7     Citation Subset:  IM    
Affiliation:
Department of Pediatrics, Albert Szent-Gyorgyi Medical and Pharmaceutical Center, University of Szeged, Szeged, Hungary. talosigy@pedia.szote.u-szeged.hu <talosigy@pedia.szote.u-szeged.hu>
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MeSH Terms
Descriptor/Qualifier:
Adult
Carbon Dioxide / analysis
Humans
Infant
Infant Mortality
Infant, Newborn
Intensive Care Units, Neonatal*
Manometry / instrumentation*
Partial Pressure
Prospective Studies
Stomach / metabolism*
Chemical
Reg. No./Substance:
124-38-9/Carbon Dioxide

From MEDLINE®/PubMed®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine


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