Document Detail


Anthropometric predictors of low birth weight outcome in teenage pregnancy.
MedLine Citation:
PMID:  3372284     Owner:  NLM     Status:  MEDLINE    
Abstract/OtherAbstract:
The highest relative risks of low birth weight are found among births to teenage mothers. An analysis of anthropometrics (weight, mid-arm circumference, and triceps skinfold) among black teenagers attending an adolescent prenatal program was studied. The sample consisted of 100 girls under 17 years. Data were collected from 19 to 35 weeks gestation. Adolescent mothers who delivered low birth weight (LBW) infants demonstrated different patterns of anthropometric changes than teen mothers who delivered normal birth weight (NBW) infants. Mean mid-arm circumference increases in the LBW group (0.05 mm/wk) were significantly less than mean increases in the NBW group (0.80 mm/wk) (p less than 0.05). Arm fat area estimates of the LBW mothers demonstrated weekly depletion (-24.9 mm2/wk), which was significantly less than those of the NBW group, who accumulated fat (+15.3 mm2/wk) (p less than .05). Changes in maternal nutritional status may in part mediate the birthweight outcome in adolescent pregnancy. Anthropometrics may be useful in predicting those teens at highest risk of bearing LBW infants.
The highest relative risks of low birth weight are found among births to teenage mothers. An analysis of anthropometrics (weight, mid-arm circumference, and triceps skinfold) among black US teenagers attending an adolescent prenatal program was studied. The sample consisted of 100 girls under 17 years. Data were collected from 19 to 35 weeks gestation. Adolescent mothers who delivered low birth weight (LBW) infants demonstrated different patterns of anthropometric changes than teen mothers who delivered normal birth weight (NBW) infants. Mean mid-arm circumference increases in the LBW group (0.05 mm/wk) were significantly less than mean increases in the NBW group (0.80 mm/wk) (p 0.05). Arm fat area estimates of the LBW mothers demonstrated weekly deplection (-24.9 mm squared/wk), which was significantly less than those of the NBW group, who accumulated fat (+15.3 mm squared/wk)(p 0.05). Changes in maternal nutritional status may in part mediate the birthweight outcome in adolescent pregnancy. Anthropometrics may be useful in predicting those teens at highest risk of bearing LBW infants. In conclusion, the LBW phenomenon in young teenagers may be due to an inadequate maternal accumulation of fat stores and/or an excessive mobilization of fat during gestation. Marginal fat reserves and a habitually limited food intake and/or stage of life cycle, despite a weight gain that is apparently compatible with successful adult pregnancy outcome, may diminish a teen mother's ability to sustain the rapid fetal weight gain during the 3rd trimester beyond approximately 35 weeks gestation. Appropriate nutrition and psychosocial and medical intervention may alter the LBW outcome.
Authors:
M J Maso; E J Gong; M S Jacobson; D S Bross; F P Heald
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Publication Detail:
Type:  Journal Article; Research Support, U.S. Gov't, P.H.S.    
Journal Detail:
Title:  Journal of adolescent health care : official publication of the Society for Adolescent Medicine     Volume:  9     ISSN:  0197-0070     ISO Abbreviation:  J Adolesc Health Care     Publication Date:  1988 May 
Date Detail:
Created Date:  1988-07-01     Completed Date:  1988-07-01     Revised Date:  2007-11-14    
Medline Journal Info:
Nlm Unique ID:  8100395     Medline TA:  J Adolesc Health Care     Country:  UNITED STATES    
Other Details:
Languages:  eng     Pagination:  188-93     Citation Subset:  IM; J    
Affiliation:
Department of Pediatrics, University of Maryland School of Medicine, Baltimore 21201.
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MeSH Terms
Descriptor/Qualifier:
Adolescent
Anthropometry*
Birth Weight
Body Weight
Female
Humans
Infant, Low Birth Weight*
Infant, Newborn
Pregnancy
Pregnancy Outcome*
Pregnancy in Adolescence*
Prospective Studies
Risk
Skinfold Thickness
Grant Support
ID/Acronym/Agency:
MCJ 000980//PHS HHS

From MEDLINE®/PubMed®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine


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