Document Detail


Aneurysmal coronary artery disease. Atherosclerotic coronary artery ectasia or adult mucocutaneous lymph node syndrome (Kawasaki's disease)?
MedLine Citation:
PMID:  9118721     Owner:  NLM     Status:  MEDLINE    
Abstract/OtherAbstract:
A 46-year-old white man presented with a history of multiple myocardial infarctions since the age of 32. Coronary angiography demonstrated severe aneurysmal coronary artery disease. Four-vessel coronary artery bypass grafting (CABG) using bilateral internal mammary arteries and the left radial artery was successfully performed. The differential diagnosis of early onset adult aneurysmal coronary artery disease is discussed, with emphasis on Kawasaki's disease and atherosclerotic coronary artery ectasia. When CABG is indicated, total arterial revascularization should be attempted.
Authors:
O M Shapira; R J Shemin
Publication Detail:
Type:  Case Reports; Journal Article    
Journal Detail:
Title:  Chest     Volume:  111     ISSN:  0012-3692     ISO Abbreviation:  Chest     Publication Date:  1997 Mar 
Date Detail:
Created Date:  1997-04-24     Completed Date:  1997-04-24     Revised Date:  2007-11-15    
Medline Journal Info:
Nlm Unique ID:  0231335     Medline TA:  Chest     Country:  UNITED STATES    
Other Details:
Languages:  eng     Pagination:  796-9     Citation Subset:  AIM; IM    
Affiliation:
Department of Cardiothoracic Surgery, Boston University Medical Center, MA 02118, USA.
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MeSH Terms
Descriptor/Qualifier:
Coronary Aneurysm / complications,  radiography*,  surgery
Coronary Angiography
Coronary Artery Bypass
Coronary Artery Disease / radiography*
Diagnosis, Differential
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Mucocutaneous Lymph Node Syndrome / radiography*
Myocardial Infarction / complications

From MEDLINE®/PubMed®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine


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