Document Detail


Analysis of Anopheles arabiensis blood feeding behavior in southern Zambia during the two years after introduction of insecticide-treated bed nets.
MedLine Citation:
PMID:  20889878     Owner:  NLM     Status:  MEDLINE    
Abstract/OtherAbstract:
Anopheles arabiensis mosquitoes are the primary vector responsible for Plasmodium falciparum transmission in Macha, Zambia. Because insecticide-treated bed nets (ITNs) have the potential to alter host feeding behavior, the extent of the zoophilic and exophagic tendencies of the vector was evaluated during the two rainy seasons after ITN introduction. Centers for Disease Control light traps, paired indoor/outdoor human landing catches, and outdoor cattle-baited collections were used to assess potential changes in host preference. Results support the hypothesis that An. arabiensis mosquitoes in Macha remain highly anthropophilic despite high ITN use. Anopheles arabiensis mosquitoes in Macha appear to be relatively exophagic and have been caught biting outdoors immediately after sunset and before sunrise, potentially circumventing some of the protective effects of ITNs.
Authors:
Christen M Fornadel; Laura C Norris; Gregory E Glass; Douglas E Norris
Related Documents :
22377658 - Self-protective whole body motion for humanoid robots based on synergy of global reacti...
22675138 - Deceptive vibratory communication: pupae of a beetle exploit the freeze response of lar...
21252308 - Influence of systematic increases in treadmill walking speed on gait kinematics after s...
21856308 - Differential control of light-dark adaptation in the ocelli and compound eyes of triato...
2808148 - Correlations between various measures of head size and auditory brainstem response late...
16600638 - Force dynamic response of tibialis anterior-ankle joint unit in humans.
Publication Detail:
Type:  Journal Article; Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't    
Journal Detail:
Title:  The American journal of tropical medicine and hygiene     Volume:  83     ISSN:  1476-1645     ISO Abbreviation:  Am. J. Trop. Med. Hyg.     Publication Date:  2010 Oct 
Date Detail:
Created Date:  2010-10-04     Completed Date:  2010-10-29     Revised Date:  2014-06-18    
Medline Journal Info:
Nlm Unique ID:  0370507     Medline TA:  Am J Trop Med Hyg     Country:  United States    
Other Details:
Languages:  eng     Pagination:  848-53     Citation Subset:  AIM; IM    
Export Citation:
APA/MLA Format     Download EndNote     Download BibTex
MeSH Terms
Descriptor/Qualifier:
Adolescent
Adult
Animals
Anopheles / physiology*
Cattle
Child
Child, Preschool
Feeding Behavior / drug effects
Female
Humans
Infant
Insect Bites and Stings / prevention & control
Insect Vectors / physiology*
Insecticide-Treated Bednets*
Insecticides / pharmacology*
Male
Mosquito Control / instrumentation
Pyrethrins / pharmacology
Seasons
Time Factors
Young Adult
Zambia
Grant Support
ID/Acronym/Agency:
5D43TW001587/TW/FIC NIH HHS; T32 AI007417/AI/NIAID NIH HHS; T32AI007417/AI/NIAID NIH HHS
Chemical
Reg. No./Substance:
0/Insecticides; 0/Pyrethrins
Comments/Corrections

From MEDLINE®/PubMed®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine


Previous Document:  A comparison of iron and folate with folate alone in hematologic recovery of children treated for ac...
Next Document:  Predicting the unmet need for biologically targeted coverage of insecticide-treated nets in Kenya.