Document Detail


Amphibian chytridiomycosis.
MedLine Citation:
PMID:  21268969     Owner:  NLM     Status:  In-Process    
Abstract/OtherAbstract:
Amphibian chytridiomycosis is a fungal disease caused by the chytrid fungus Batrachochytrium dendrobatidis. It is arguably the most significant recorded infectious disease of any vertebrate class. The disease is reducing amphibian biodiversity across most continents and regions of the world, affecting the resilience of surviving populations and driving multiple species to extinction. It is now recognised by the World Organisation for Animal Health (OIE) as an internationally notifiable disease. Collaborative research in areas including the development of diagnostic assays, distribution and impact of the disease, and management (treatment and policy) has assisted in leading a paradigm shift in accepting infectious disease as a major factor influencing wildlife population stability and biodiversity.
Authors:
Alex D Hyatt; Richard Speare; Andrew A Cunningham; Cynthia Carey
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Publication Detail:
Type:  Journal Article    
Journal Detail:
Title:  Diseases of aquatic organisms     Volume:  92     ISSN:  0177-5103     ISO Abbreviation:  Dis. Aquat. Org.     Publication Date:  2010 Nov 
Date Detail:
Created Date:  2011-01-28     Completed Date:  -     Revised Date:  -    
Medline Journal Info:
Nlm Unique ID:  8807037     Medline TA:  Dis Aquat Organ     Country:  Germany    
Other Details:
Languages:  eng     Pagination:  89-91     Citation Subset:  IM    
Affiliation:
CSIRO, Livestock Industries, Australian Animal Health Laboratory, Geelong, Victoria 3220, Australia. alex.hyatt@csiro.au
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