Document Detail


Altered functional brain networks in Prader-Willi syndrome.
MedLine Citation:
PMID:  23335390     Owner:  NLM     Status:  MEDLINE    
Abstract/OtherAbstract:
Prader-Willi syndrome (PWS) is a genetic imprinting disorder characterized mainly by hyperphagia and early childhood obesity. Previous functional neuroimaging studies used visual stimuli to examine abnormal activities in the eating-related neural circuitry of patients with PWS. It was found that patients with PWS exhibited both excessive hunger and hyperphagia consistently, even in situations without any food stimulation. In the present study, we employed resting-state functional MRI techniques to investigate abnormal brain networks related to eating disorders in children with PWS. First, we applied amplitude of low-frequency fluctuation analysis to define the regions of interest that showed significant alterations in resting-state brain activity levels in patients compared with their sibling control group. We then applied a functional connectivity (FC) analysis to these regions of interest in order to characterize interactions among the brain regions. Our results demonstrated that patients with PWS showed decreased FC strength in the medial prefrontal cortex (MPFC)/inferior parietal lobe (IPL), MPFC/precuneus, IPL/precuneus and IPL/hippocampus in the default mode network; decreased FC strength in the pre-/postcentral gyri and dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (DLPFC)/orbitofrontal cortex (OFC) in the motor sensory network and prefrontal cortex network, respectively; and increased FC strength in the anterior cingulate cortex/insula, ventrolateral prefrontal cortex (VLPFC)/OFC and DLPFC/VLPFC in the core network and prefrontal cortex network, respectively. These findings indicate that there are FC alterations among the brain regions implicated in eating as well as rewarding, even during the resting state, which may provide further evidence supporting the use of PWS as a model to study obesity and to provide information on potential neural targets for the medical treatment of overeating.
Authors:
Yi Zhang; Heng Zhao; Siyou Qiu; Jie Tian; Xiaotong Wen; Jennifer L Miller; Karen M von Deneen; Zhenyu Zhou; Mark S Gold; Yijun Liu
Publication Detail:
Type:  Journal Article; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't; Research Support, U.S. Gov't, Non-P.H.S.     Date:  2013-01-21
Journal Detail:
Title:  NMR in biomedicine     Volume:  26     ISSN:  1099-1492     ISO Abbreviation:  NMR Biomed     Publication Date:  2013 Jun 
Date Detail:
Created Date:  2013-04-23     Completed Date:  2013-11-08     Revised Date:  2014-06-03    
Medline Journal Info:
Nlm Unique ID:  8915233     Medline TA:  NMR Biomed     Country:  England    
Other Details:
Languages:  eng     Pagination:  622-9     Citation Subset:  IM    
Copyright Information:
Copyright © 2013 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.
Export Citation:
APA/MLA Format     Download EndNote     Download BibTex
MeSH Terms
Descriptor/Qualifier:
Adolescent
Brain / physiopathology*
Brain Mapping
Child
Child, Preschool
Eating Disorders / physiopathology*
Female
Humans
Infant
Infant, Newborn
Magnetic Resonance Imaging / methods*
Male
Nerve Net / physiopathology*
Parietal Lobe / physiopathology
Prader-Willi Syndrome / physiopathology*
Prefrontal Cortex / physiopathology
Grant Support
ID/Acronym/Agency:
K23 DK081203/DK/NIDDK NIH HHS
Comments/Corrections

From MEDLINE®/PubMed®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine


Previous Document:  Surface-Micromachined Microfiltration Membranes for Efficient Isolation and Functional Immunophenoty...
Next Document:  Complex calcaneal defect reconstruction with osteotomized free fibula-flexor hallucis longus osteomu...