Document Detail


Alcohol consumption and aortic arch calcification in an older Chinese sample: The Guangzhou Biobank Cohort Study.
MedLine Citation:
PMID:  21813196     Owner:  NLM     Status:  Publisher    
Abstract/OtherAbstract:
OBJECTIVE: To examine the association between alcohol consumption and aortic arch calcification (AAC) in an older Chinese sample. METHODS: In 27,844 older people aged 50-85, socioeconomic position and lifestyle factors were assessed by a questionnaire. The presence and severity of AAC were diagnosed from chest X-ray by two experienced radiologists. RESULTS: In men, the risk for AAC increased significantly in frequent or excessive drinkers [adjusted odds ratio (OR)=1.36 (95% confidence interval (CI) 1.16-1.59) and 1.49 (1.21-1.83) for those who drank >5times/week and those who drank excessively, respectively] (P for trend from 0.002 to 0.001). When AAC was analyzed as an outcome variable with 3 categories of severity, significant dose-response relations between the severity of AAC and alcohol consumption were observed, with those who drank frequently (>5/week) or excessively having more serious AAC (P for trend=0.03 and 0.02, respectively). No significant association was found in women as few drank excessively. CONCLUSION: The presence and severity of AAC were associated with quantity or frequency of alcohol consumption in a dose-response pattern, suggesting that alcohol drinking, even when moderate, has no benefit for AAC. Excessive drinking increased the risk of AAC by 50% compared to never drinkers.
Authors:
Chao Qiang Jiang; Lin Xu; Tai Hing Lam; G Neil Thomas; Wei Sen Zhang; Kar Keung Cheng; C Mary Schooling
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Publication Detail:
Type:  JOURNAL ARTICLE     Date:  2011-8-1
Journal Detail:
Title:  International journal of cardiology     Volume:  -     ISSN:  1874-1754     ISO Abbreviation:  -     Publication Date:  2011 Aug 
Date Detail:
Created Date:  2011-8-4     Completed Date:  -     Revised Date:  -    
Medline Journal Info:
Nlm Unique ID:  8200291     Medline TA:  Int J Cardiol     Country:  -    
Other Details:
Languages:  ENG     Pagination:  -     Citation Subset:  -    
Copyright Information:
Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.
Affiliation:
Guangzhou No. 12 Hospital, Guangzhou 510620, China.
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