Document Detail


Agreement between maternal self-reported ethanol intake and tobacco use during pregnancy and meconium assays for fatty acid ethyl esters and cotinine.
MedLine Citation:
PMID:  14507607     Owner:  NLM     Status:  MEDLINE    
Abstract/OtherAbstract:
Reliance on self-reported use of tobacco and intake of ethanol during pregnancy is associated with a high probability of error. Use of biological markers, or biomarkers, potentially offers a more valid method to assess exposure. Although cotinine is an established biomarker for tobacco use, there is no established biomarker for in utero ethanol exposure. Recent reports suggest that fatty acid ethyl esters (FAEE) could serve this purpose. To assess agreement between maternal self-reported tobacco use and ethanol intake during pregnancy and detection of metabolites associated with tobacco use (cotinine) and ethanol intake (FAEE), the authors studied maternal histories and meconium samples obtained in November-December 1999 from 436 consecutive mother-infant pairs at a large urban regional perinatal center in Honolulu, Hawaii. Cohen's kappa coefficient and 95% confidence intervals were calculated. Moderate agreement was found between reported tobacco use during the third trimester and detected cotinine level (kappa = 0.53, 95% confidence interval: 0.39, 0.68); however, there was no agreement between reported ethanol intake during the third trimester and detected FAEE (kappa = -0.02, 95% confidence interval: -0.04, 0.00). No mother reporting ethanol intake during the third trimester had detectable FAEE. Findings support the need for additional refinement and validation of the use of FAEE as a biomarker for maternal ethanol intake.
Authors:
Chris Derauf; Alan R Katz; David Easa
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Publication Detail:
Type:  Comparative Study; Journal Article; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't    
Journal Detail:
Title:  American journal of epidemiology     Volume:  158     ISSN:  0002-9262     ISO Abbreviation:  Am. J. Epidemiol.     Publication Date:  2003 Oct 
Date Detail:
Created Date:  2003-09-25     Completed Date:  2003-10-23     Revised Date:  2013-06-09    
Medline Journal Info:
Nlm Unique ID:  7910653     Medline TA:  Am J Epidemiol     Country:  United States    
Other Details:
Languages:  eng     Pagination:  705-9     Citation Subset:  IM    
Affiliation:
Department of Pediatrics, University of Hawaii John A. Burns School of Medicine, Honolulu, HI 96826, USA. c.derauf@worldnet.att.net
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MeSH Terms
Descriptor/Qualifier:
Alcohol Drinking / epidemiology*,  metabolism
Biological Markers / analysis
Cohort Studies
Cotinine / analysis*
Fatty Acids / analysis*
Female
Hawaii / epidemiology
Hospitals, Maternity / statistics & numerical data
Hospitals, Urban / statistics & numerical data
Humans
Infant, Newborn
Maternal-Fetal Exchange*
Meconium / chemistry*
Medical History Taking / statistics & numerical data
Pregnancy
Pregnancy Complications / epidemiology*
Pregnancy Trimester, Third / metabolism
Sensitivity and Specificity
Tobacco Use Disorder / epidemiology*,  metabolism
Grant Support
ID/Acronym/Agency:
P20 RR011091-10/RR/NCRR NIH HHS
Chemical
Reg. No./Substance:
0/Biological Markers; 0/Fatty Acids; 486-56-6/Cotinine
Comments/Corrections

From MEDLINE®/PubMed®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine


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