Document Detail


Aerobic Capacity With Hybrid FES Rowing in Spinal Cord Injury: Comparison With Arms-Only Exercise and Preliminary Findings With Regular Training.
MedLine Citation:
PMID:  21944299     Owner:  NLM     Status:  Publisher    
Abstract/OtherAbstract:
OBJECTIVE: To determine the magnitude and range of increases in peak aerobic capacity with hybrid-functional electrical stimulation (FES) rowing versus arms-only rowing in persons with spinal cord injury. DESIGN: Comparison of graded exercise tests for peak responses during FES rowing and arms-only rowing. Preliminary data on adaptations to FES row training were gathered in a subset of individuals. SETTING: Outpatient cardiovascular research laboratory. PARTICIPANTS: Six male patients with spinal cord injury (T4-T9, American Spinal Injury Association class A). METHODS OR INTERVENTION: Arms-only rowing was compared with FES rowing, in which the person who is exercising synchronizes the voluntarily controlled upper body movement with the FES-controlled leg movement via stimulation to the paralyzed leg muscles. A subgroup (n = 3) completed at least 6 months of a progressive FES row training exercise program with graded exercise tests every 6 months. MAIN OUTCOME MEASUREMENTS: Peak oxygen consumption, peak ventilation, peak respiratory exchange ratio, peak heart rate, and peak oxygen pulse. RESULTS: Peak oxygen consumption was greater during FES rowing than during arms-only rowing (20.0 ± 1.9 mL/kg/min versus 15.7 ± 1.5 mL/kg/min, P = .01). Peak ventilation was similar, whereas peak respiratory exchange ratio and peak heart rate tended to be lower (P = .14 and P = .19, respectively). As a result, oxygen pulse was greater by 35% during FES rowing. Two of the three persons who completed at least 6 months of FES row training demonstrated increases in aerobic capacity greater than those previously observed in able-bodied individuals. CONCLUSIONS: FES rowing may provide a more robust exercise stimulus for persons with spinal cord injury than most options currently available because of the greater aerobic demand.
Authors:
J Andrew Taylor; Glen Picard; Jeffrey J Widrick
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Publication Detail:
Type:  -    
Journal Detail:
Title:  PM & R : the journal of injury, function, and rehabilitation     Volume:  3     ISSN:  1934-1563     ISO Abbreviation:  -     Publication Date:  2011 Sep 
Date Detail:
Created Date:  2011-9-27     Completed Date:  -     Revised Date:  -    
Medline Journal Info:
Nlm Unique ID:  101491319     Medline TA:  PM R     Country:  -    
Other Details:
Languages:  ENG     Pagination:  817-824     Citation Subset:  -    
Copyright Information:
Copyright © 2011 American Academy of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.
Affiliation:
Department of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation, Harvard Medical School, and Cardiovascular Research Laboratory, Spaulding Rehabilitation Hospital, 125 Nashua St, Boston, MA 02114(⁎).
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