Document Detail


Adrenergic mechanisms do not contribute to age-related decreases in calf venous compliance.
MedLine Citation:
PMID:  20884839     Owner:  NLM     Status:  MEDLINE    
Abstract/OtherAbstract:
Limb venous compliance decreases with advancing age, even in healthy humans. To test the hypothesis that adrenergic mechanisms contribute to age-associated reductions in limb venous compliance, we measured calf venous compliance before and during acute systemic α- and β-adrenergic blockade in eight young (27 ± 1 yr old, mean ± SE) and eight older healthy men (67 ± 2 yr old). Calf venous compliance was determined in supine subjects by inflating a thigh-collecting cuff to 60 mmHg for 8 min and then decreasing it (1 mmHg/s) to 0 mmHg while calf volume was indexed with a strain gauge. The slope (·10⁻³) of the pressure-compliance relation (compliance= β₁ + 2·β₂·cuff pressure), which is the first derivative of the quadratic pressure-volume relation [(Δlimb volume) = β₀+ β₁·(cuff pressure) + β₂·(cuff pressure)²] during reductions in cuff pressure, was used to quantify calf venous compliance. Calf venous compliance was ∼30% lower (P < 0.01) in older compared with young men before adrenergic blockade. In response to adrenergic blockade calf venous compliance did not increase in young (-2.62 ± 0.14 and -2.29 ± 0.18 ml·dl⁻¹·mmHg⁻¹, before and during blockade, respectively) or older men (-1.78 ± 0.27 and -1.68 ± 0.21 ml·dl⁻¹ ·mmHg⁻¹). Moreover, during adrenergic blockade differences in calf venous compliance between young and older men observed before adrenergic blockade persisted. Collectively, these data strongly suggest that adrenergic mechanisms neither directly restrain calf venous compliance in young or older men nor do they contribute to age-associated reductions in calf venous compliance in healthy men.
Authors:
John A Sielatycki; Saum Shamimi-Noori; Michael P Pfeiffer; Kevin D Monahan
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Publication Detail:
Type:  Journal Article; Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural     Date:  2010-09-30
Journal Detail:
Title:  Journal of applied physiology (Bethesda, Md. : 1985)     Volume:  110     ISSN:  1522-1601     ISO Abbreviation:  J. Appl. Physiol.     Publication Date:  2011 Jan 
Date Detail:
Created Date:  2011-01-13     Completed Date:  2011-08-02     Revised Date:  2013-09-26    
Medline Journal Info:
Nlm Unique ID:  8502536     Medline TA:  J Appl Physiol (1985)     Country:  United States    
Other Details:
Languages:  eng     Pagination:  29-34     Citation Subset:  IM    
Affiliation:
Penn State Heart and Vascular Institute, The Milton S. Hershey Medical Center, Hershey, PA 17033-2390, USA.
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MeSH Terms
Descriptor/Qualifier:
Adult
Aged
Aging / physiology*
Elasticity / physiology
Humans
Leg / blood supply
Male
Middle Aged
Receptors, Adrenergic / metabolism*
Vascular Resistance / physiology
Veins / physiology*
Grant Support
ID/Acronym/Agency:
AG-24420/AG/NIA NIH HHS; HL-92309/HL/NHLBI NIH HHS; K01 AG024420/AG/NIA NIH HHS; M01-RR-10732/RR/NCRR NIH HHS; R21 HL092309/HL/NHLBI NIH HHS
Chemical
Reg. No./Substance:
0/Receptors, Adrenergic
Comments/Corrections
Comment In:
J Appl Physiol (1985). 2011 Jan;110(1):11-2   [PMID:  21051572 ]

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