Document Detail


Adoptive immunotherapy for cancer: harnessing the T cell response.
MedLine Citation:
PMID:  22437939     Owner:  NLM     Status:  MEDLINE    
Abstract/OtherAbstract:
Immunotherapy based on the adoptive transfer of naturally occurring or gene-engineered T cells can mediate tumour regression in patients with metastatic cancer. Here, we discuss progress in the use of adoptively transferred T cells, focusing on how they can mediate tumour cell eradication. Recent advances include more accurate targeting of antigens expressed by tumours and the associated vasculature, and the successful use of gene engineering to re-target T cells before their transfer into the patient. We also describe how new research has helped to identify the particular T cell subsets that can most effectively promote tumour eradication.
Authors:
Nicholas P Restifo; Mark E Dudley; Steven A Rosenberg
Publication Detail:
Type:  Journal Article; Research Support, N.I.H., Intramural; Review     Date:  2012-03-22
Journal Detail:
Title:  Nature reviews. Immunology     Volume:  12     ISSN:  1474-1741     ISO Abbreviation:  Nat. Rev. Immunol.     Publication Date:  2012 Apr 
Date Detail:
Created Date:  2012-03-22     Completed Date:  2012-07-09     Revised Date:  2014-03-18    
Medline Journal Info:
Nlm Unique ID:  101124169     Medline TA:  Nat Rev Immunol     Country:  England    
Other Details:
Languages:  eng     Pagination:  269-81     Citation Subset:  IM    
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MeSH Terms
Descriptor/Qualifier:
Animals
Genetic Engineering / methods
Humans
Immunotherapy, Adoptive / methods*
Neoplasms / immunology*,  therapy*
T-Lymphocytes / immunology*,  transplantation*
Comments/Corrections
Comment In:
Trends Immunol. 2014 Feb;35(2):47-8   [PMID:  24439426 ]

From MEDLINE®/PubMed®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine


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